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Rights group says Lebanese towns, villages increasingly imposing curfews on Syrian refugees

  • Families of missing soldiers who were kidnapped by Islamic State militants and the Al-Nusra front, chant slogans as they hold portraits of Lebanese soldier Saif Thebian, during a demonstration to demand action to secure the captives release, in front the Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014. Militants, including from the Islamic State extremist group, seized around 30 soldiers and policemen after overrunning a Lebanese border town in early August. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

    Families of missing soldiers who were kidnapped by Islamic State militants and the Al-Nusra front, chant slogans as they hold portraits of Lebanese soldier Saif Thebian, during a demonstration to demand action to secure the captives release, in front the Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014. Militants, including from the Islamic State extremist group, seized around 30 soldiers and policemen after overrunning a Lebanese border town in early August. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)  (The Associated Press)

  • Relatives of missing Lebanese soldier Saif Thebian, who was kidnapped by Islamic State militants and the Al-Nusra front, chant slogans as they hold his portrait, during a demonstration to demand action to secure the captives release, in front the Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014. Militants, including from the Islamic State extremist group, seized around 30 soldiers and policemen after overrunning a Lebanese border town in early August. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

    Relatives of missing Lebanese soldier Saif Thebian, who was kidnapped by Islamic State militants and the Al-Nusra front, chant slogans as they hold his portrait, during a demonstration to demand action to secure the captives release, in front the Lebanese government building, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014. Militants, including from the Islamic State extremist group, seized around 30 soldiers and policemen after overrunning a Lebanese border town in early August. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)  (The Associated Press)

An international human rights group says Lebanese towns and villages have increasingly imposed curfews on Syrian refugees in the country.

Human Rights Watch says the curfews restrict refugees' movements and "contribute to a climate of discriminatory and retaliatory practices against them."

The New York-based group said in a statement Friday it has identified at least 45 towns and villages across Lebanon that have imposed such curfews.

Lebanon is home to more than 1 million Syrian refugees, who are already seen by many Lebanese as a burden on the tiny country with a population of just 4.5 million people.

Attacks against Syrians, as well as curfews, have intensified since Aug. 2, when Islamic militants crossed into Lebanon and captured more than 20 soldiers and police officers.