World

Poland's new prime minister will strive for greater US military presence in country

  • Poland's new prime minister Ewa Kopacz delivers her inaugural speech in the parliament in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Kopacz took over the post from Donald Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Poland's new prime minister Ewa Kopacz delivers her inaugural speech in the parliament in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Kopacz took over the post from Donald Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

  • Poland's new prime minister Ewa Kopacz delivers her inaugural speech in the parliament  in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Kopacz took over the post from Donald Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Poland's new prime minister Ewa Kopacz delivers her inaugural speech in the parliament in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Kopacz took over the post from Donald Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

  • Former Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk, right, applauds his successor Ewa Kopacz during her inaugural speech in the parliament in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Kopacz took over the post from Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    Former Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk, right, applauds his successor Ewa Kopacz during her inaugural speech in the parliament in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. Kopacz took over the post from Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

Poland's new prime minister says she will work for a greater U.S. military presence in Poland.

In her inaugural speech to parliament, Ewa Kopacz also said Wednesday that Poland's relationship with the U.S. has grown more important given the conflict in neighboring Ukraine.

Kopacz also said she supported Poland's adoption of the euro currency, but didn't commit herself to a date. She said the moment would be right when Poland's economy is stable and the eurozone has strengthened further.

She faces a confidence vote later in the day but is expected to survive it since her center-right Civic Platform party and its junior coalition partner, the Polish People's Party, has a majority.

Kopacz took over from Donald Tusk, who will head the European Council starting Dec. 1.