World

Earthquake in rural Peru kills eight, leaves hundreds homeless

Rescue workers carry a body from the the ruins of a collapsed house after a 4.9 magnitude earthquake shook a remote Andean village near the city of Cuzco, Peru, Sunday Sept 28, 2014. The moderate quake centered just 5 miles underground killed at least 8 people and destroyed several homes that left dozens homeless as well as knocking out power in the village. (AP Photo)

Rescue workers carry a body from the the ruins of a collapsed house after a 4.9 magnitude earthquake shook a remote Andean village near the city of Cuzco, Peru, Sunday Sept 28, 2014. The moderate quake centered just 5 miles underground killed at least 8 people and destroyed several homes that left dozens homeless as well as knocking out power in the village. (AP Photo)

A shallow, 4.9-magnitude earthquake killed at least eight people whose crudely constructed homes collapsed in a remote Andean village near Cuzco, a Peruvian civil defense official said Sunday.

The moderate quake struck Saturday night at a depth of just 5 miles and affected the village of Misca, as well as the nearby communities of Cusibamba Bajo, Cajay, Canopato, Mollejcato, Muyoc and Toray in the province of Paruro in Cuzco region.

Peruvian Civil Defense released a statement saying that 45 adobe-and-stone houses collapsed and 70 more homes were cracked and left uninhabitable by the earthquake.

Peru's government declared a 90-day state of emergency in the area. President Ollanta Humala said the state of emergency would help rebuild Misca, a village of 160 Quechua inhabitants located 370 miles southeast of Lima that was at the epicenter of the quake.

"The population has lost everything," said Humala after visiting the village.

Misca resident Alfredo Castilla, 29, told the Associated Press that "the only thing standing is the school, which was built with cement. Almost everything else is destroyed, including our only church," a reference to the Santisima Trinidad church, which was built out of adobe and stone in the 18th century.

Carlos Castro of Civil Defense said that the death toll stood at eight.

Follow us on twitter.com/foxnewslatino
Like us at facebook.com/foxnewslatino