GLOBAL ECONOMY

Argentina uses drones to spot wealthy tax evaders in Buenos Aires

FILE - In this March 12, 2014 file photo, a drone prepares to land after flying over the scene of an explosion that leveled two apartment buildings in East Harlem in New York. When government officials designed a new air traffic control system, they neglected to take something into account _ drones. The FAA has already spent over a decade and more than $5 billion on the complex and ambitious new system dubbed NextGen, and is nearly finished installing hardware and software for several key systems. But with demand to fly unmanned aircraft escalating, there are questions about whether the new air traffic system will be able to accommodate them. The farther along the program gets, the more difficult it becomes to go back and make changes. The program isn’t expected to be completed for at least another decade. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

FILE - In this March 12, 2014 file photo, a drone prepares to land after flying over the scene of an explosion that leveled two apartment buildings in East Harlem in New York. When government officials designed a new air traffic control system, they neglected to take something into account _ drones. The FAA has already spent over a decade and more than $5 billion on the complex and ambitious new system dubbed NextGen, and is nearly finished installing hardware and software for several key systems. But with demand to fly unmanned aircraft escalating, there are questions about whether the new air traffic system will be able to accommodate them. The farther along the program gets, the more difficult it becomes to go back and make changes. The program isn’t expected to be completed for at least another decade. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)  (Ap)

Argentine tax evaders beware: The government is using a drone to spot you.

The Buenos Aires province's tax agency said Wednesday that it has used drones to identify some 200 mansions and about 100 swimming pools that haven't been declared by their owners.

The tax agency says the unmanned aircraft flew over an exclusive neighborhood near the city of Buenos Aires and took images of luxury houses standing on lots registered as being empty.

Owners of the properties have been told to get their papers in order and get ready to pay hefty fines on a total tax evasion estimated at $2 million.

The cost of each drone is about $10,000. The technology is also often used by Argentine security forces.

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