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Scotland: In the big referendum on independence, a look at who won and who lost

  • British Prime Minister David Cameron leaves after giving a statement to the media about Scotland's referendum results, outside his official residence at 10 Downing Street in central London,  Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence, deciding to remain part of the United Kingdom after a historic referendum that shook the country to its core. The decision prevented a rupture of a 307-year union with England, bringing a huge sigh of relief to the British political establishment. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    British Prime Minister David Cameron leaves after giving a statement to the media about Scotland's referendum results, outside his official residence at 10 Downing Street in central London, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence, deciding to remain part of the United Kingdom after a historic referendum that shook the country to its core. The decision prevented a rupture of a 307-year union with England, bringing a huge sigh of relief to the British political establishment. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)  (The Associated Press)

  • Britain's former Prime Minister Gordon Brown talks to a NO campaigner, outside the polling station at North Queensferry Community Centre, in Queensferry, Scotland, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Polls opened across Scotland in a referendum that will decide whether the country leaves its 307-year-old union with England and becomes an independent state. (AP Photo//PA, Andrew Milligan) UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    Britain's former Prime Minister Gordon Brown talks to a NO campaigner, outside the polling station at North Queensferry Community Centre, in Queensferry, Scotland, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. Polls opened across Scotland in a referendum that will decide whether the country leaves its 307-year-old union with England and becomes an independent state. (AP Photo//PA, Andrew Milligan) UNITED KINGDOM OUT  (The Associated Press)

  • Discarded Yes campaign advertising material is littered on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence and decided that Scotland will remain part of the United Kingdom. The result announced early Friday was the one favored by Britain's political leaders, who had campaigned hard in recent weeks to convince Scottish voters to stay. It dashed many Scots' hopes of breaking free and building their own nation. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)

    Discarded Yes campaign advertising material is littered on the Royal Mile in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence and decided that Scotland will remain part of the United Kingdom. The result announced early Friday was the one favored by Britain's political leaders, who had campaigned hard in recent weeks to convince Scottish voters to stay. It dashed many Scots' hopes of breaking free and building their own nation. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)  (The Associated Press)

Who won and who lost in Scotland's independence referendum?

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WINNERS: The 55.3 percent of Scottish voters who wanted to stay in the United Kingdom.

LOSERS: The 44.7 percent who disagreed.

WINNER: Gordon Brown. The former prime minister broke out of what seemed to be a long sulk since losing the 2010 election, and delivered a barnstorming defense of the United Kingdom which gave the No campaign some badly needed energy in the final days.

LOSER and WINNER: Alex Salmond. The leader of the Scottish National Party, which exists mainly to pursue independence, went down fighting for what he called a once-in-a-lifetime chance to win back the nation's independence. He led a campaign that energized all of Scotland. And in losing, he gained promises from U.K. political leaders of important new power for the Scottish government.

WINNER: David Cameron. The prime minister stood to be in trouble if the vote had gone the other way. However, his promise of more powers for the regions may cause grumbling in his Conservative Party.

WINNER: J.K. Rowling, the "Harry Potter" author, who gave 1 million pounds ($1.6 million) to the No campaign.

LOSERS: Chris and Colin Weir, who gave 1 million pounds ($1.6 million) to the Yes campaign, leaving them with barely more than 160 million pounds from their Euromillions lottery win.

WINNER: The British pound. It sank toward the end of the campaign because markets loathe uncertainty. It bounced back smartly once the votes were counted.

WINNER? Queen Elizabeth II, whose Delphic comment urging Scots to "think very carefully about the future" was widely interpreted as a nudge for the No campaign. Perhaps it was just common sense.

WINNER: Democracy: Nearly 85 percent of eligible voters participated in the decision.