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Early results suggest Scots reject independence from UK; huge turnout in historic referendum

  • NO ballots are stacked on a table during the Scottish independence referendum count at the Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday Sept. 19, 2014. From the capital of Edinburgh to the far-flung Shetland Islands, Scots embraced a historic moment and the rest of the United Kingdom held its breath after voters turned out in unprecedented numbers for an independence referendum that could end the country's 307-year union with England.  (AP Photo/David Cheskin)

    NO ballots are stacked on a table during the Scottish independence referendum count at the Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday Sept. 19, 2014. From the capital of Edinburgh to the far-flung Shetland Islands, Scots embraced a historic moment and the rest of the United Kingdom held its breath after voters turned out in unprecedented numbers for an independence referendum that could end the country's 307-year union with England. (AP Photo/David Cheskin)  (The Associated Press)

  • Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond looks down during a press conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence and decided that Scotland will remain part of the United Kingdom. The result announced early Friday was the one favored by Britain's political leaders, who had campaigned hard in recent weeks to convince Scottish voters to stay. It dashed many Scots' hopes of breaking free and building their own nation. (AP Photo/PA, Danny Lawson) UNITED KINGDOM OUT, NO SALES, NO ARCHIVE

    Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond looks down during a press conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence and decided that Scotland will remain part of the United Kingdom. The result announced early Friday was the one favored by Britain's political leaders, who had campaigned hard in recent weeks to convince Scottish voters to stay. It dashed many Scots' hopes of breaking free and building their own nation. (AP Photo/PA, Danny Lawson) UNITED KINGDOM OUT, NO SALES, NO ARCHIVE  (The Associated Press)

  • Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond looks down during a press conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence and decided that Scotland will remain part of the United Kingdom. The result announced early Friday was the one favored by Britain's political leaders, who had campaigned hard in recent weeks to convince Scottish voters to stay. It dashed many Scots' hopes of breaking free and building their own nation. (AP Photo/PA, Danny Lawson) UNITED KINGDOM OUT, NO SALES, NO ARCHIVE

    Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond looks down during a press conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, Friday, Sept. 19, 2014. Scottish voters have rejected independence and decided that Scotland will remain part of the United Kingdom. The result announced early Friday was the one favored by Britain's political leaders, who had campaigned hard in recent weeks to convince Scottish voters to stay. It dashed many Scots' hopes of breaking free and building their own nation. (AP Photo/PA, Danny Lawson) UNITED KINGDOM OUT, NO SALES, NO ARCHIVE  (The Associated Press)

Voters in Scotland turned out in unprecedented numbers for an independence referendum and early results suggested they were not in favor of ending Scotland's 307-year union with England.

With 26 of 32 regional electoral centers reporting, the No side had about 54 percent of the vote to 46 percent for the Yes side. Those against independence also scored a big win by strongly taking Aberdeen, Scotland's oil capital.

The average turnout was 86 percent — a record high.

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson told the BBC she was confident the "silent majority" of Scots would deliver a No victory.