World

Father of Norwegian mass murderer Breivik speaks of guilt in rare public appearance

  • Jens Breivik, the father of Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik speaks at a press conference in connection with the launch of his book, "My fault?", in Oslo, Norway, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. In his first news conference since the July 22, 2011, attacks that killed 77 people, Jens Breivik told reporters: "If I had had more contact with him, If I had been a better father, then maybe he would have been a different person today." (AP Photo, NTB Scanpix, Torstein Boe)

    Jens Breivik, the father of Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik speaks at a press conference in connection with the launch of his book, "My fault?", in Oslo, Norway, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. In his first news conference since the July 22, 2011, attacks that killed 77 people, Jens Breivik told reporters: "If I had had more contact with him, If I had been a better father, then maybe he would have been a different person today." (AP Photo, NTB Scanpix, Torstein Boe)  (The Associated Press)

  • Jens Breivik, the father of Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik speaks at a press conference in connection with the launch of his book, "My fault?", in Oslo, Norway, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. In his first news conference since the July 22, 2011, attacks that killed 77 people, Jens Breivik told reporters: "If I had had more contact with him, If I had been a better father, then maybe he would have been a different person today." (AP Photo, NTB Scanpix, Torstein Boe)

    Jens Breivik, the father of Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik speaks at a press conference in connection with the launch of his book, "My fault?", in Oslo, Norway, Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014. In his first news conference since the July 22, 2011, attacks that killed 77 people, Jens Breivik told reporters: "If I had had more contact with him, If I had been a better father, then maybe he would have been a different person today." (AP Photo, NTB Scanpix, Torstein Boe)  (The Associated Press)

The father of Norwegian terrorist Anders Behring Breivik says he grapples with guilt for not being closer to his son when he was growing up.

In his first news conference since the July 22, 2011, attacks that killed 77 people, Jens Breivik told reporters: "If I had had more contact with him, If I had been a better father, then maybe he would have been a different person today."

A self-described nationalist militant, Breivik planted a powerful bomb in Oslo's government district before slaughtering 69 people — most of them teenagers — in a shooting rampage at the summer camp of a left-wing youth group.

Speaking to reporters in connection with the launch of his book "My fault?" Jens Breivik said he hoped his imprisoned son would eventually show remorse.