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With 48 hours to go, 2 sides scramble to convert swing voters in Scottish independence vote

  • A passerby argues with two Scottish independence referendum 'Yes' supporters holding a Scottish Saltire flag outside the "Better Together" No campaign offices in Edinburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014.  If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security — the European Union and the U.S.-led NATO defense alliance.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    A passerby argues with two Scottish independence referendum 'Yes' supporters holding a Scottish Saltire flag outside the "Better Together" No campaign offices in Edinburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security — the European Union and the U.S.-led NATO defense alliance. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

  • A pair of Saltire's fly above a Yes sign in Eyemouth, Scotland, Tueday, Sept. 16, 2014. The two sides in Scotland's independence debate are scrambling to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation. Anti-independence campaigners are pushing home their message that a "No" vote doesn't mean the status quo. The three main British political parties are promising Scotland greater powers, including tax-raising authority, if it remains part of the United Kingdom. The Yes campaign says the promises are vague and reveal the No side's desperation, with polls suggesting the outcome will be close. Scottish Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said "the only way to guarantee the real powers we need in Scotland is to vote Yes." (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)

    A pair of Saltire's fly above a Yes sign in Eyemouth, Scotland, Tueday, Sept. 16, 2014. The two sides in Scotland's independence debate are scrambling to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation. Anti-independence campaigners are pushing home their message that a "No" vote doesn't mean the status quo. The three main British political parties are promising Scotland greater powers, including tax-raising authority, if it remains part of the United Kingdom. The Yes campaign says the promises are vague and reveal the No side's desperation, with polls suggesting the outcome will be close. Scottish Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said "the only way to guarantee the real powers we need in Scotland is to vote Yes." (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)  (The Associated Press)

  • Two Scottish independence referendum Yes supporters hold a Scottish Saltire flag up outside the "Better Together" No campaign offices in Edinburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014.  If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security — the European Union and the U.S.-led NATO defense alliance.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    Two Scottish independence referendum Yes supporters hold a Scottish Saltire flag up outside the "Better Together" No campaign offices in Edinburgh, Scotland, Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. If Scottish voters this week say Yes to independence, not only will they tear up the map of Great Britain, they'll shake the twin pillars of Western Europe's postwar prosperity and security — the European Union and the U.S.-led NATO defense alliance. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)  (The Associated Press)

The two sides in Scotland's independence debate are scrambling to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation.

Anti-independence campaigners are pushing home their message that a "No" vote doesn't mean the status quo. The three main British political parties are promising Scotland greater powers, including tax-raising authority, if it remains part of the United Kingdom.

Labour Party lawmaker Douglas Alexander said Tuesday that a No vote would mean "faster, safer, better change for Scotland."

The Yes campaign says the promises are vague and reveal the No side's desperation, with polls suggesting the outcome will be close.

Scottish Deputy First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said "the only way to guarantee the real powers we need in Scotland is to vote Yes."