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UK political leaders to make last-minute Scotland trip in bid to counter pro-independence tide

Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond meets with Scots and other European citizens to celebrate European citizenship and "Scotland's continued EU membership with a Yes vote" at  Parliament Square in Edinburgh, Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. Opinion polls showing that the independence referendum in Scotland is too close to call have prompted widespread selling of the British pound. If the actual vote on Sept. 18 delivers a knockout blow to Scotland’s 307-year union with England, that selling could become even more pronounced as the United Kingdom is likely plunged into the biggest constitutional crisis in its history. The fate of the British pound, which has been one of the most tangible links of the union, will be front and center of the separation proceedings as it has been for the past few months during the cut and thrust of the campaign. (AP Photo/Andrew Milligan, PA Wire)     UNITED KINGDOM OUT   -   NO SALES    -    NO ARCHIVES

Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond meets with Scots and other European citizens to celebrate European citizenship and "Scotland's continued EU membership with a Yes vote" at Parliament Square in Edinburgh, Scotland, Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014. Opinion polls showing that the independence referendum in Scotland is too close to call have prompted widespread selling of the British pound. If the actual vote on Sept. 18 delivers a knockout blow to Scotland’s 307-year union with England, that selling could become even more pronounced as the United Kingdom is likely plunged into the biggest constitutional crisis in its history. The fate of the British pound, which has been one of the most tangible links of the union, will be front and center of the separation proceedings as it has been for the past few months during the cut and thrust of the campaign. (AP Photo/Andrew Milligan, PA Wire) UNITED KINGDOM OUT - NO SALES - NO ARCHIVES  (The Associated Press)

Britain's prime minister and main opposition leader are canceling their weekly showdown in Parliament to unite in a last-minute bid to persuade Scots to reject independence.

Prime Minister David Cameron and Labour leader Ed Miliband say they will skip Wednesday's scheduled House of Commons faceoff and travel separately to Scotland.

They said "our message to the Scottish people will be simple: 'We want you to stay.'"

Britain's political leaders have been rattled by polls suggesting the two sides are neck-and-neck ahead of a Sept. 18 referendum on independence.

Labour, Cameron's Conservatives and the Liberal Democrats have all promised Scotland more autonomy if voters say no to separation.

Scottish First Minister Alex Salmond said Tuesday that the last-minute proposals were a "sign of the total disintegration of the No campaign."