World

New UN envoy to Libya opposes foreign intervention, says it won't end country's turmoil

  • Libyan Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz, second left, attends a Cairo gathering of foreign ministers of Libya's neighbors in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. Foreign ministers from Egypt Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, and Chad, as well as the Arab League Secretary General, met Monday as weeks of inter-militia fighting has wreaked havoc in Libya. It's the worst violence in Libya since the 2011 downfall and killing of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

    Libyan Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz, second left, attends a Cairo gathering of foreign ministers of Libya's neighbors in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. Foreign ministers from Egypt Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, and Chad, as well as the Arab League Secretary General, met Monday as weeks of inter-militia fighting has wreaked havoc in Libya. It's the worst violence in Libya since the 2011 downfall and killing of dictator Moammar Gadhafi. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)  (The Associated Press)

  • Libyan Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz, right, listens to his Egyptian counterpart Sameh Shukri, left, during the opening session of The Fourth Ministerial Meeting for the Neighbouring Countries of Libya, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. Foreign ministers from Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, Chad, as well as the Arab League Secretary General met Monday in Cairo as Islamist-led militias in the Libyan capital say they consolidated their hold on Tripoli and its international airport, driving out rivals to the city's outskirts after battles that largely destroyed the strategic hub. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)

    Libyan Foreign Minister Mohamed Abdelaziz, right, listens to his Egyptian counterpart Sameh Shukri, left, during the opening session of The Fourth Ministerial Meeting for the Neighbouring Countries of Libya, in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. Foreign ministers from Egypt, Libya, Algeria, Tunisia, Sudan, Chad, as well as the Arab League Secretary General met Monday in Cairo as Islamist-led militias in the Libyan capital say they consolidated their hold on Tripoli and its international airport, driving out rivals to the city's outskirts after battles that largely destroyed the strategic hub. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)  (The Associated Press)

The newly appointed U.N. envoy to Libya says he doesn't believe a foreign intervention can halt the North African country's turmoil as political divisions and infighting push it deeper into chaos.

Bernardino Leon says Libya needs international support to back "Libyans who want to fight chaos ... through a political process."

The Spanish diplomat spoke in Cairo on Tuesday on his final trip as a European envoy to the region, before he takes up his new post as U.N.'s special envoy to Libya next month.

Some Libyan lawmakers have called for international intervention to help stabilize the country, awash with weapons and dominated by rival militias and allied political groups.

The power struggle in Libya intensified in recent weeks, leaving it with two rival governments and two parliaments.