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Filipino wartime 'comfort women' seek justice from Japan, denounce Philippine leader's silence

  • Philippines Sex Slaves-1.jpg

    Filipino Narcisa Claveria, 84, who claims to have been a sex slave during World War II, shouts slogans during a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in Manila, Philippines Wednesday, June 25, 2014. A group of alleged Filipino "comfort women" demanded recognition following the announcement of the affirmation of the Kono Statement as a result of the Japanese government investigation on the alleged WWII sexual slavery in Korea. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila) (The Associated Press)

  • Philippines Sex Slaves-2.jpg

    Felicidad delos Reyes, 85, who claims to have been a sex slave during World War II, stands beside slogans during a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in Manila, Philippines Wednesday June 25, 2014. A group of alleged Filipino "comfort women" demanded recognition following the announcement of the affirmation of the Kono Statement as a result of the Japanese government investigation on the alleged WWII sexual slavery in Korea. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila) (The Associated Press)

  • Philippines Sex Slaves-3.jpg

    A Filipino woman who claims to have been a sex slave during World War II takes a rest during a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in Manila, Philippines Wednesday June 25, 2014. A group of alleged "comfort women" staged a rally following the announcement of the affirmation of the Kono Statement as a result of the Japanese government investigation on the alleged WWII sexual slavery in Korea. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila) (The Associated Press)

  • Philippines Sex Slaves-4.jpg

    South Korean activists join a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in Manila, Philippines Wednesday June 25, 2014. A group of alleged Filipino "comfort women" demanded recognition following the announcement of the affirmation of the Kono Statement as a result of the Japanese government investigation on the alleged WWII sexual slavery in Korea. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila) (The Associated Press)

  • 77461a7bca290f18580f6a706700ae38.jpg

    A Filipino woman claiming to have been a sex slave during World War II, shouts slogans during a rally in front of the Japanese Embassy in Manila, Philippines Wednesday June 25, 2014. A group of alleged Filipino "comfort women" demanded recognition following the announcement of the affirmation of the Kono statement as a result of the Japanese government investigation on the alleged WWII sexual slavery in Korea. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila) (The Associated Press)

Filipino women forced into prostitution by the Japanese military during World War II have marched to the Japanese Embassy to demand justice and to criticize Philippine President Benigno Aquino III's silence on the issue during his recent visit to Japan.

Six women in their 80s and some two dozen supporters and activists picketed the embassy Wednesday to call on Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to apologize and compensate them for their ordeal.

They say Japan must go beyond statements and resolve the issue following its landmark 1993 apology for forcing Asian women into wartime prostitution.

A Japanese panel last week confirmed the validity of a study that led to Japan's 1993 apology. Abe has been criticized for backpedaling from past Japanese acknowledgements of wartime atrocities.