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Polish prosecutors probe eavesdropping on top officials that PM called an attempted coup

  • Poland’s Prime Minister Donald Tusk gestures as he tells a news conference in Warsaw, Poland on Monday, June 16, 2014, that he sees no reason to fire the Interior Minister after a secret recording was published in the media, suggesting he was making an improper under-the-table deal with the head of the central bank. Tusk said the two official did not break the law, but were discussing ways of helping the Polish state. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Poland’s Prime Minister Donald Tusk gestures as he tells a news conference in Warsaw, Poland on Monday, June 16, 2014, that he sees no reason to fire the Interior Minister after a secret recording was published in the media, suggesting he was making an improper under-the-table deal with the head of the central bank. Tusk said the two official did not break the law, but were discussing ways of helping the Polish state. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - This Thursday June 10, 2010 file photo, shows Marek Belka, new chief of the National Bank of Poland, prior to a meeting with Parliament Speaker, acting president Bronislaw Komorowski after the parliament confirmed him as the new central bank governor, in Warsaw, Poland. The Polish government and central bank were in damage-control mode on Monday June 16, 2014 after a secret recording was published in which two key leaders appeared to be making an improper under-the-table deal. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz, File)

    FILE - This Thursday June 10, 2010 file photo, shows Marek Belka, new chief of the National Bank of Poland, prior to a meeting with Parliament Speaker, acting president Bronislaw Komorowski after the parliament confirmed him as the new central bank governor, in Warsaw, Poland. The Polish government and central bank were in damage-control mode on Monday June 16, 2014 after a secret recording was published in which two key leaders appeared to be making an improper under-the-table deal. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • Poland’s Prime Minister Donald Tusk tells a news conference in Warsaw, Poland on Monday, June 16, 2014, that he sees no reason to fire the Interior Minister after a secret recording was published in the media, suggesting he was making an improper under-the-table deal with the head of the central bank. Tusk said the two official did not break the law, but were discussing ways of helping the Polish state. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Poland’s Prime Minister Donald Tusk tells a news conference in Warsaw, Poland on Monday, June 16, 2014, that he sees no reason to fire the Interior Minister after a secret recording was published in the media, suggesting he was making an improper under-the-table deal with the head of the central bank. Tusk said the two official did not break the law, but were discussing ways of helping the Polish state. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

Polish prosecutors have launched a criminal investigation into the recording of a private conversation between the country's interior minister and the head of the central bank that was later published by a magazine.

In the recording, the two discussed how the National Bank of Poland could help the government increase its chances of winning re-election in 2015. The central bank is supposed to be independent from the government and interference either way is prohibited.

Prime Minister Donald Tusk has said the secret bugging, a criminal offense in Poland, amounts to an attempted coup.

Renata Mazur, a spokeswoman for the Warsaw prosecutors, said Tuesday the probe was opened at the request of Interior Minister Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz, who acted in the capacity of a victim.

The magazine, Wprost, had no immediate comment.