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The Good Book And Reefer Madness: Okla. Politician Cites Bible For Legalizing Marijuana

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - FEBRUARY 07:  A cannabis plant grows in the Amsterdam Cannabis College, a non profit charitable organisation that gives information on cannabis and hemp use on February 7, 2007 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The city council in Amsterdam has recently voted in favour of introducing a citywide ban on smoking marijuana in public areas. A successful trial ban in the De Baarsjes district of Amsterdam has been declared a success after a reduction in anti social behaviour.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS - FEBRUARY 07: A cannabis plant grows in the Amsterdam Cannabis College, a non profit charitable organisation that gives information on cannabis and hemp use on February 7, 2007 in Amsterdam, Netherlands. The city council in Amsterdam has recently voted in favour of introducing a citywide ban on smoking marijuana in public areas. A successful trial ban in the De Baarsjes district of Amsterdam has been declared a success after a reduction in anti social behaviour. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)  (2007 Getty Images)

The Bible is the best selling book in history, and one Oklahoma state senator hopes that it will help her in her push to legalize marijuana in her state. Oklahoma state Sen. Constance Johnson is arguing that God created the “miraculous plant.” That's according to the TheBlaze.com.

Johnson has even cited Genesis 1:29, which deals with the biblical story of creation and the Lord’s intentions for mankind, in her efforts. 

That passage reads, "Then God said, 'Behold, I have given you every plant yielding seed that is on the surface of all the earth, and every tree which has fruit yielding seed; it shall be food for you.'"

Johnson argues that legalization would alleviate the burden on prisons that house non-violent drug offenders and bring financial benefits to the state from a $7 per ounce tax on recreational marijuana. The revenue would be divvied up between the Department of Education (30 percent), the Oklahoma City County Health Department (20 percent) and the general revenue fund (50 percent), the Christian Post reported.

Johnson needs 160,000 signatures to get the measure onto the November ballot.

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