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North Korea releases list of US 'human rights abuses'

North Korea Parliament.jpg

Oct. 10, 2010: In this file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Il's son Kim Jong Un attends a massive military parade marking the 65th anniversary of the ruling Workers' Party in Pyongyang, North Korea.AP

North Korea is pushing back against a United Nations report on its human rights violations with a report of its own -- one that lists "human rights abuses" in the U.S.

The official Korean Central News Agency on Wednesday released a news article titled "News Analysis on Poor Human Rights Records in U.S.," which discusses racial discrimination, unemployment and poverty, The Washington Post reported.

The article refers to the U.S. as "the world's worst human right abuser and tundra of a human being's rights to existence" and makes the following points:

  • "Under the citizenship act, racialism is getting more severe in the U.S. The gaps between the minorities and the whites are very wide in the exercise of such rights to work and elect."

  • "The U.S. true colors as a kingdom of racial discrimination was fully revealed by last year's case that the Florida Court gave a verdict of not guilty to a white policeman who shot to death an innocent black boy."


  • "That's why 52 percent of the Americans have said that racism still exists in the country while 46 percent contended that all sorts of discrimination would be everlasting."

  • "The U.S. is a living hell as elementary rights to existence are ruthlessly violated."

North Korea previously accused the U.S. of  orchestrating the U.N. commission's February report that it committed crimes against humanity, calling the findings and recommendations  "extremely dangerous" political provocations.

The U.N. Commission of Inquiry found evidence of an array of crimes, including "extermination," crimes against humanity against starving populations and a widespread campaign of abductions of individuals in South Korea and Japan. 

The three-member panel recommended that the U.N. Security Council refer its findings to the International Criminal Court, which is unlikely to happen given likely opposition among permanent council members that have veto power to prevent the move.

Click here for more from The Washington Post.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.