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Colleagues say Afghan police officer who shot AP journalists seemed a calm and pious man

  • Afghanistan Shooting Investigation-1.jpg

    FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2013 file photo, Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, right, and AP journalist Kathy Gannon, are pictured during a visit to the photo agency Keystone in Zurich, Switzerland. Fellow officers say the Afghan police commander who killed Niedringhaus and wounded Gannon on April 4, 2014, seemed a calm, pious man who may have come under the influence of Islamic fundamentalists calling for vengeance against foreigners over drone strikes.(AP Photo/Keystone, Walter Bieri, File)The Associated Press

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    FILE - In this Saturday, April 5, 2014 file photo, roses lay in front of a picture of the Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus, 48, who was killed April 4, 2014 in Afghanistan, in Paris. Fellow officers say the Afghan police commander who killed Niedringhaus and wounded reporter Kathy Gannon seemed a calm, pious man who may have come under the influence of Islamic fundamentalists calling for vengeance against foreigners over drone strikes. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)The Associated Press

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    FILE - This Friday, April 4, 2014 file photo shows bullet holes in the car in which Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus and AP reporter Kathy Gannon were traveling when they were shot by an Afghan policeman, in Khost, Afghanistan. Niedringhaus, 48, an internationally acclaimed German photographer, was killed instantly, according to an AP Television News freelancer who witnessed the shooting. Gannon was wounded twice and is receiving medical attention. Fellow officers say the Afghan police commander responsible for the shooting seemed a calm, pious man who may have come under the influence of Islamic fundamentalists calling for vengeance against foreigners over drone strikes. (AP Photo, File)The Associated Press

Fellow officers say the Afghan police commander who killed an Associated Press photographer and wounded an AP reporter seemed a calm, pious man who may have come under the influence of Islamic extremists calling for vengeance against foreigners over drone strikes.

But the Afghan Interior Ministry overseeing the investigation told the AP it won't speculate about a motive so early in its probe into the man who killed AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus and seriously wounded senior correspondent Kathy Gannon. The gunman surrendered immediately after the attack Friday in front of dozens of security forces and election workers on a heavily guarded government compound in eastern Afghanistan.

The suspect, identified as a unit commander named Naqibullah, was transferred to the capital, Kabul, on Tuesday, and central government authorities have now started to question him.