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Japan agrees to hand to US weapons grade plutonium, uranium at start of nuclear summit

  • APTOPIX Netherlands Nuclear Summit-1.jpg

    President Barack Obama, center, and two secret service agents are silhouetted as he walks towards Marine One helicopter upon arrival at Schiphol Amsterdam Airport, Netherlands, Monday March 24, 2014. Obama will attend the two-day Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, POOL) (The Associated Press)

  • Netherlands Nuclear Summit-2.jpg

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, left, arrives at Schiphol Amsterdam airport, Netherlands, Sunday March 23, 2014, one day ahead of the March 24 and 25 Nuclear Security Summit. (AP Photo/Sean Gallup, Pool) (The Associated Press)

  • Netherlands Nuclear Summit-3.jpg

    U.S. President Barack Obama, left, shares a laugh with Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, right, during a visit to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Monday, March 24, 2014. Obama will attend the two-day Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein) (The Associated Press)

  • Netherlands Nuclear Summit-4.jpg

    Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte addresses the media, ahead of the March 24 and 25 Nuclear Security Summit in The Hague, the Netherlands, on Sunday, March 23, 2014. The Nuclear Security Summit in the Hague will form the backdrop for an emergency meeting of Group of Seven leaders on Russia's annexation of Crimea. It's a confrontation between Russia and the West reminiscent of the Cold War. (AP Photo/Freek van den Bergh, POOL) (The Associated Press)

Japan plans to turn over to the United States more than 315 kilograms (700 pounds) of weapons-grade plutonium and a supply of highly enriched uranium, a victory for President Barack Obama's efforts to secure nuclear materials around the world.

American and Japanese officials announced the deal Monday at a nuclear security summit in The Hague.

U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz calls the deal "a very significant nuclear security pledge."

Yosuke Isozaki, a senior adviser to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, says the handing over of highly enriched uranium and plutonium is part of Japan's efforts to prevent proliferation and possible abuse of nuclear material by terrorists — the main aim of the Hague summit.