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Cricket initiative in Argentina slums seen as way to lift children out of poverty

  • Argentina Slum Cricket-1.jpg

    Caacupe cricket team players pose for a picture at the Villa 21-24 slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, March 22, 2014. The International Cricket Council has recognized the team, formed from the children of the Villa 21-24 shantytown, honoring them as a global example for expanding the sport, which in certain countries, like India, is widely played, but in many parts of the world restricted to elite sectors of society. Introducing cricket in the slum began in 2009 as an idea to transform the game into a social integration mechanism, before that it rarely breached the gates of the country's upscale private schools. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) (The Associated Press)

  • Argentina Slum Cricket-2.jpg

    Milagros Mendez, left, catches a ball during a Caacupe cricket team training session at the Villa 21-24 slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, March 22, 2014. The International Cricket Council has recognized the team, formed from the children of the Villa 21-24 shantytown, honoring them as a global example for expanding the sport, which in certain countries, like India, is widely played, but in many parts of the world restricted to elite sectors of society. Introducing cricket in the slum began in 2009 as an idea to transform the game into a social integration mechanism, before that it rarely breached the gates of the country's upscale private schools. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) (The Associated Press)

  • Argentina Slum Cricket-3.jpg

    Milagros Mendez, center, hits the ball during Caacupe cricket team training session at the Villa 21-24 slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, March 22, 2014. The International Cricket Council has recognized the team, formed from the children of the Villa 21-24 shantytown, honoring them as a global example for expanding the sport, which in certain countries, like India, is widely played, but in many parts of the world restricted to elite sectors of society. Introducing cricket in the slum began in 2009 as an idea to transform the game into a social integration mechanism, before that it rarely breached the gates of the country's upscale private schools. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) (The Associated Press)

  • Argentina Slum Cricket-4.jpg

    Caacupe cricket team Milagros Mendez, left, bats during a training session at the Villa 21-24 slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, March 22, 2014. The International Cricket Council has recognized the team, formed from the children of the Villa 21-24 shantytown, honoring them as a global example for expanding the sport, which in certain countries, like India, is widely played, but in many parts of the world restricted to elite sectors of society. Introducing cricket in the slum began in 2009 as an idea to transform the game into a social integration mechanism, before that it rarely breached the gates of the country's upscale private schools. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) (The Associated Press)

  • Argentina Slum Cricket-5.jpg

    Caacupe cricket team members play during a training session at the Villa 21-24 slum in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Saturday, March 22, 2014. The International Cricket Council has recognized the team, formed from the children of the Villa 21-24 shantytown, honoring them as a global example for expanding the sport, which in certain countries, like India, is widely played, but in many parts of the world restricted to elite sectors of society. Introducing cricket in the slum began in 2009 as an idea to transform the game into a social integration mechanism, before that it rarely breached the gates of the country's upscale private schools. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko) (The Associated Press)

Children living in the slums of Argentina's capital are playing cricket as part of an initiative to help them escape poverty and crime.

Villa 21-24 slum in Buenos Aires is so dangerous that most outsiders don't enter. But the ball-and-bat sport is being played here, far from its usual green field.

The International Cricket Council awarded The Argentine Cricket Association with its Best Spirit of Cricket Initiative last year. The ICC says the pairing of students from an upscale school to teach slum children the sport sets an example worldwide.

Cricket originated in Britain but is also widely played in South Asia.

The sport was introduced to the slum in 2009 as a way to integrate children to a game that was reserved for Argentina's upscale private schools.