Menu
Home

World

Kerry vows US support for SKorea, warns North Korea against aggression

  • 16ee740d34b6b3064b0f6a706700d363.jpg

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, looks at South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, right, delivering a speech Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, in Seoul, South Korea. Kerry is visiting South Korea, China, Indonesia, and the United Arab Emirates on a seven-day trip. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, Pool)The Associated Press

  • 599f977034b0b3064b0f6a706700f80e.jpg

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, right, shank hands during their meeting Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, in Seoul, South Korea. Kerry is visiting South Korea, China, Indonesia, and the United Arab Emirates on a seven-day trip. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, Pool)The Associated Press

  • 1cd8d44c34b0b3064b0f6a7067007db1.jpg

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se, right, speak during their meeting Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014, in Seoul, South Korea. Kerry is visiting South Korea, China, Indonesia, and the United Arab Emirates on a seven-day trip. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, Pool)The Associated Press

  • 0645c3e9343db1064b0f6a706700b927.jpg

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry talks with South Korean President Park Geun-hye during their meeting at the Blue House in Seoul Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. Kerry arrived in Asia on Thursday on a mission aimed largely at easing tensions between China and its smaller neighbors over territorial disputes and exploring ways to restart long-stalled talks on ridding North Korea of nuclear weapons. (AP Photo/Kim Hong-ji, Pool)The Associated Press

  • c9672ad03438b1064b0f6a706700d2f0.jpg

    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, shakes hands with South Korean President Park Geun-Hye before their meeting at the Blue House in Seoul Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014. Kerry arrived in Asia on Thursday on a mission aimed largely at easing tensions between China and its smaller neighbors over territorial disputes and exploring ways to restart long-stalled talks on ridding North Korea of nuclear weapons. (AP Photo/Kim Hong-Ji, Pool)The Associated Press

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and his South Korean counterpart are warning North Korea against any possible aggression amid mixed signals from the North over returning to denuclearization talks and strains between South Korea and Japan that threaten coordination on the issue.

Kerry and Foreign Minister Yun Byung-sen on Thursday dismissed demands from the North to halt an upcoming joint U.S.-South Korean military exercise. They said the exercise could not be used as an excuse by North Korea to stay away from talks or to delay attempts to improve relations between the North and South.

Kerry said the United States is firmly committed to South Korea's defense. He added that it is vitally important for Japan and South Korea to overcome historical animosities to present a united front.