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Dixieland band, Hell's Angels attend funeral of 'Great Train Robber' Ronnie Biggs

  • 7389b8526f60df00470f6a706700d881.jpg

    Mourners carry the coffin of great train robber Ronnie Biggs into the chapel at Golders Green Crematorium in London, Friday Jan. 3, 2014. Biggs was a member of a gang that stole 2.6 million pounds from a Glasgow-to-London mail train in August 1963, in what was called the "heist of the century." He spent decades in exile in Brazil before agreeing to return to Britain, and prison, in 2001. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) (The Associated Press)

  • ead1fd826f5fdf00470f6a7067007d89.jpg

    Mourners carry the coffin of great train robber Ronnie Biggs into the chapel at Golders Green Crematorium in London, Friday Jan. 3, 2014. Biggs was a member of a gang that stole 2.6 million pounds from a Glasgow-to-London mail train in August 1963, in what was called the "heist of the century." He spent decades in exile in Brazil before agreeing to return to Britain, and prison, in 2001. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) (The Associated Press)

  • dc2b05896f5fdf00470f6a70670016ac.jpg

    Mourners carry the coffin of great train robber Ronnie Biggs into the chapel at Golders Green Crematorium in London, Friday Jan. 3, 2014. Biggs was a member of a gang that stole 2.6 million pounds from a Glasgow-to-London mail train in August 1963, in what was called the "heist of the century." He spent decades in exile in Brazil before agreeing to return to Britain, and prison, in 2001. (AP Photo/Sang Tan) (The Associated Press)

Defiant to the end, British train robber Ronnie Biggs has been laid to rest at a funeral complete with a Dixieland band, an honor guard of Hells Angels and a cheeky floral tribute.

A hearse carrying Biggs, who died last month aged 84, was escorted by 13 bikers to London's Golders Green Crematorium on Friday.

The hearse bore a white floral wreath in the shape of a rude two-fingered salute. The coffin was draped in the flags of Britain and Brazil.

Biggs was part of a gang that pulled off the 1963 "Great Train Robbery" of a cash-packed Glasgow-to-London mail train.

Biggs was jailed but escaped and made his way to Brazil, where he lived for more than 30 years before returning voluntarily to Britain, and prison, in 2001.