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After attack on capital, C. African Republic Christian militias seek to overthrow president

  • ad39a613229bfd2a450f6a7067001e0b.jpg

    Anti-Balaka Christian militiamen gather in a forest clearing outside Central African Republic's capital Bangui, Sunday Dec. 15, 2013. The leader of the Christian militia says his fighters won’t put down their rebellion until President Michel Djotodia is gone from power, raising the specter of a prolonged sectarian conflict in the country. More than 600 people have been killed since Anti-Balaka launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) (The Associated Press)

  • 52b492962289fc2a450f6a706700c79d.jpg

    Anti-Balaka Christian militiamen walk through a forest clearing outside Central African Republic's capital Bangui Sunday Dec. 15, 2013. The leader of the Christian militia says his fighters won’t put down their rebellion until President Michel Djotodia is gone from power, raising the specter of a prolonged sectarian conflict in the country. More than 600 people have been killed since Anti-Balaka launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) (The Associated Press)

  • 2e6e03d1228afc2a450f6a706700d2ef.jpg

    Anti-Balaka Christian militiamen walk through a forest clearing outside Central African Republic's capital Bangui Sunday Dec. 15, 2013. The leader of the Christian militia says his fighters won’t put down their rebellion until President Michel Djotodia is gone from power, raising the specter of a prolonged sectarian conflict in the country. More than 600 people have been killed since Anti-Balaka launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) (The Associated Press)

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    A former FARCA (Central African Republic Forces) soldier linked to Anti-Balaka Christian militiamen guards their camp in the Boeing neighborhood of the Central African Republic's capital Bangui Sunday Dec. 15, 2013. The leader of the Christian militia says his fighters won’t put down their rebellion until President Michel Djotodia is gone from power, raising the specter of a prolonged sectarian conflict in the country.More than 600 people have been killed since Anti-Balaka launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) (The Associated Press)

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    Former FARCA (Central African Republic Forces) soldiers linked to Anti-Balaka Christian militiamen who have set camp in a school in the Boeing neighborhood of the Central African Republic's capital Bangui pose Sunday Dec. 15, 2013. The leader of the Christian militia says his fighters won’t put down their rebellion until President Michel Djotodia is gone from power, raising the specter of a prolonged sectarian conflict in the country.More than 600 people have been killed since Anti-Balaka launched a strike over Bangui last week before being pushed back. (AP Photo/Jerome Delay) (The Associated Press)

Christian militiamen and a former officer in Central African Republic's national army say they are working together to topple rebel leader-turned-President Michel Djotodia, who took power in a March 2013 coup.

The AP made contact with anti-balaka militiamen Sunday through an intermediary. Militia leader Richard Bejouane says "we are revolting so that Djotodia and his fighters leave, and the country can live in peace."

The anti-balaka are working in tandem with members of the national army. Former army officer Alfred Rombhot says some 2,000 men are ready to fight Djotodia's forces with everything from machetes to poisoned bows-and-arrows.

The collaboration is evidence that the opposition movement is growing. It could set the stage for a protracted sectarian conflict even as 1,600 French troops on the ground try to secure peace.