World

British Prime Minister visits China to boost trade ties after chill over Dalai Lama

  • British Prime Minister David Cameron, center, attends a welcome ceremony with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    British Prime Minister David Cameron, center, attends a welcome ceremony with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

  • British Prime Minister David Cameron, left, walks with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang past the British flag as they arrive for a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    British Prime Minister David Cameron, left, walks with Chinese Premier Li Keqiang past the British flag as they arrive for a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

  • British Prime Minister David Cameron, left, is shown the way by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    British Prime Minister David Cameron, left, is shown the way by Chinese Premier Li Keqiang during a welcome ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Monday, Dec. 2, 2013. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)  (The Associated Press)

British Prime Minister David Cameron is promoting business relations on a visit to China after Beijing derailed an earlier visit in retaliation for his meeting with the Dalai Lama.

Cameron is leading a trade mission with six government ministers on a visit that started Monday. He is expected to voice support for a deal to free up trade between China and the European Union.

The British government says such a deal could be worth up to 1.8 billion British pounds ($2.95 billion) a year to the British economy.

Economic exchanges with Britain were held up after Cameron met last year with the Dalai Lama, Tibet's exiled Buddhist leader, whom China reviles as a separatist.