World

Europe's climate chief says future of UN process hinges on strong deal in 2015

  • EU Commisioner for Climate Action Connie Hedegaard, right,  talks with Alice Akinyi Kaudia from Kenya prior to the opening of the High-level Segment of th UN Climate Change Conference in Warsaw, Poland, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)

    EU Commisioner for Climate Action Connie Hedegaard, right, talks with Alice Akinyi Kaudia from Kenya prior to the opening of the High-level Segment of th UN Climate Change Conference in Warsaw, Poland, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Alik Keplicz)  (The Associated Press)

  • Unidentified delegates listen to a translated commentary during the closing session of the U.N. Climate Change talks in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday Nov. 23, 2013.  It is announced Saturday that developed countries and fast-growing economies have reached a last-minute compromise to avert a breakdown of U.N. climate talks in Warsaw, with an acceptable wording being adopted. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)

    Unidentified delegates listen to a translated commentary during the closing session of the U.N. Climate Change talks in Warsaw, Poland, Saturday Nov. 23, 2013. It is announced Saturday that developed countries and fast-growing economies have reached a last-minute compromise to avert a breakdown of U.N. climate talks in Warsaw, with an acceptable wording being adopted. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)  (The Associated Press)

After another U.N. climate conference gave only modest results, European Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard says the process needs to provide a "substantial answer" to global warming in two years to remain relevant.

Hedegaard told The Associated Press on Sunday that even if the process succeeds in producing a major climate pact in 2015, it's worth reconsidering whether the international confabs need to be held every year, and whether the scope of each session should be narrower.

The session that concluded on Saturday produced a vague road map on how to prepare for a global climate pact that is supposed to be adopted in two years, work Hedegaard says will be crucial in answering whether the world still needs the U.N. process.