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Russian opposition activists throw tomatoes at Dutch royal couple during their Moscow visit

  • King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands and Queen Maxima attend a concert by Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra at the Tchaikovsky Conservatorium in Moscow, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013.  The royal visit was expected to showcase friendly ties between Russia and the Netherlands, but it comes amid increasing tensions over the seizure of the Dutch-flagged Greenpeace ship and its crew and other disputes. At left is Deputy Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich.  (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, Pool)

    King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands and Queen Maxima attend a concert by Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra at the Tchaikovsky Conservatorium in Moscow, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013. The royal visit was expected to showcase friendly ties between Russia and the Netherlands, but it comes amid increasing tensions over the seizure of the Dutch-flagged Greenpeace ship and its crew and other disputes. At left is Deputy Prime Minister Arkady Dvorkovich. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

  • King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands and Queen Maxima, third right, attend a concert by Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013.  The royal visit was expected to showcase friendly ties between Russia and the Netherlands, but it comes amid increasing tensions over the seizure of the Dutch-flagged Greenpeace ship and its crew and other disputes. (AP Photo/Maxim Shipenkov, Pool)

    King Willem-Alexander of the Netherlands and Queen Maxima, third right, attend a concert by Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra at the Tchaikovsky Conservatory in Moscow, Saturday, Nov. 9, 2013. The royal visit was expected to showcase friendly ties between Russia and the Netherlands, but it comes amid increasing tensions over the seizure of the Dutch-flagged Greenpeace ship and its crew and other disputes. (AP Photo/Maxim Shipenkov, Pool)  (The Associated Press)

A Russian opposition group says its activists have thrown tomatoes at Dutch King Willem-Alexander and his wife, Queen Maxima, as they arrived for a concert in Moscow.

Eduard Limonov, the leader of the banned National Bolshevik party, said two of its activists hurled tomatoes at the royals on Saturday. Russia's state security agency said they missed their target.

Limonov said Sunday the action was intended to attract public attention to what he called the Netherlands' failure to properly investigate the death of the group's member, Alexander Dolmatov, who committed suicide in January at a Dutch deportation center.

The royal visit was aimed to celebrate the two nations' historical ties, but it came amid tensions caused by Russia's seizure of a Dutch-flagged Greenpeace ship and other disputes.