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Labor group says Haiti factories unsafe, lacking toilets, dining areas and safe drinking water

  • 346fdd93e2505222400f6a70670063a0.jpg

    FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2012 file photo, Renel Prophete, 33, works on a pair of boat shoes at a local clothing and shoe factory, Caracol Industrial Park, during a visit by former U.S. President Bill Clinton in Ouanaminthe, on the outskirts of Cap Haitien, Haiti. A labor rights group is accusing clothing manufacturers in Haiti of frequently cheating workers out of their meager wages. The U.S.-based Worker Rights Consortium says in a report that workers receive an average of 32 percent less than what they should. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery, File) (The Associated Press)

  • ad09dd00e2505222400f6a706700acf8.jpg

    FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2012 file photo, people make boat shoes at a local clothing and shoe factory, Caracol Industrial Park, during a visit by former U.S. President Bill Clinton in Ouanaminthe, on the outskirts of Cap Haitien, Haiti. A labor rights group is accusing clothing manufacturers in Haiti of frequently cheating workers out of their meager wages. The U.S.-based Worker Rights Consortium says in a report that workers receive an average of 32 percent less than what they should. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery, File) (The Associated Press)

A report from a labor group is accusing Haitian garment factories of not being safe enough for their workers.

The study from Better Work says many Haitian garment workers don't have sufficient access to toilets, safe drinking water, emergency exits or medical care.

Better Work is a Geneva-headquartered labor compliance group supported by the International Labor Organization and the World Bank's International Finance Corporation.

A Haitian official says he welcomes the survey of 23 garment factories because it helps Haiti raise its standards and become more competitive on the international market.

The Better Work report was released Wednesday. It comes as an advocacy group said that some Haitian factories failed to pay workers the minimum wage, which is 200 gourdes, or $4.54, per work day.