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Kenya's deputy president says he wants his trial to continue if judges excuse him from court

In this photo released by Kenya's Presidency, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, left, shares a light moment with Deputy President William Ruto, right, shortly before departing to attend the African Union (AU) Heads of State special summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at the airport in Nairobi, Kenya Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013. African heads of state and government are meeting at the AU headquarters in Ethiopia to deliberate the continent's relationship with the International Criminal Court in The Hague, where the two men face crimes against humanity charges for Kenya's 2007-08 post-election violence in which more than 1,000 people died. (AP Photo/Kenya Presidency)

In this photo released by Kenya's Presidency, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, left, shares a light moment with Deputy President William Ruto, right, shortly before departing to attend the African Union (AU) Heads of State special summit in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at the airport in Nairobi, Kenya Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013. African heads of state and government are meeting at the AU headquarters in Ethiopia to deliberate the continent's relationship with the International Criminal Court in The Hague, where the two men face crimes against humanity charges for Kenya's 2007-08 post-election violence in which more than 1,000 people died. (AP Photo/Kenya Presidency)  (The Associated Press)

Kenya's deputy president says he wants his International Criminal Court trial to continue if judges will allow him to stay in Kenya and carry out his duties.

William Ruto said Tuesday that Kenya has asked the United Nations Security Council to defer the ICC cases against him and Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta for a year, but that he would rather his trial go ahead if he doesn't have to attend hearings in The Hague.

Ruto says, "we want this case to proceed to its logical conclusion because we are confident that finally we will be ... proven to be innocent."

Kenyatta and Ruto are charged separately with alleged involvement in Kenya's 2007-2008 post-election violence. Ruto's trial already has started, while Kenyatta's begins Nov. 12.