World

11 People Kidnapped In Mexico City Bar During Daylight Hours

A man holds up a sign with details of his recently disappeared relative during a protest in Mexico City, Thursday, May 30, 2013.  Eleven young people were kidnapped in broad daylight from a Mexico City bar, just 20 days after the grandson of civil rights leader Malcolm X was beaten to death at a nightclub in the capital, anguished relatives said Thursday. The sign reads in Spanish "Help us find him. Rafael Rojas Marines. Disappeared in the after-hours Heaven. Asking for your support!" The mother of one of the missing youths says 11 people in all vanished from the after-hours club about 1 ½ blocks from the U.S. embassy, on the other side of Reforma Avenue. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

A man holds up a sign with details of his recently disappeared relative during a protest in Mexico City, Thursday, May 30, 2013. Eleven young people were kidnapped in broad daylight from a Mexico City bar, just 20 days after the grandson of civil rights leader Malcolm X was beaten to death at a nightclub in the capital, anguished relatives said Thursday. The sign reads in Spanish "Help us find him. Rafael Rojas Marines. Disappeared in the after-hours Heaven. Asking for your support!" The mother of one of the missing youths says 11 people in all vanished from the after-hours club about 1 ½ blocks from the U.S. embassy, on the other side of Reforma Avenue. (AP Photo/Eduardo Verdugo)

Just 20 days after the grandson of civil rights leader Malcolm X was beaten to death at a nightclub in the capital, 11 young people were kidnapped in broad daylight from a Mexico City bar, anguished relatives said Thursday.

The disappearances sparked a wave of outrage, with family members blocking a major avenue to demand that authorities investigate.

The city prosecutor's office said Thursday only five missing-person reports had been filed. But the mother of one of the missing youths says 11 people in all vanished from the after-hours club about 1 ½ blocks from the U.S. embassy.

The mother, Josefina García, questioned how a mass kidnapping could occur a half-block from Reforma Avenue, the city's main boulevard, and a few blocks from police headquarters.

Malcolm Shabazz, grandson of Malcolm X, died May 9 in a dispute over a bar bill.

While Shabazz had a troubled past, friends and family recalled Thursday how he "redeemed himself" before his death.

Several hundred attended a memorial service for Shabazz at First Corinthian Baptist Church in Harlem.

In recent years, Shabazz traveled around the world speaking out against youth violence.

"It was difficult to be the grandchild of such a powerful man," said Shabazz's childhood school teacher Angela Freeman, in whose house Shabazz lived for a few months as a child.

"He had to work through it (Betty Shabazz's death), and he did," she said.

Freeman said Shabazz was a witty, bright child who was "very affected" by his grandfather's assassination.

"Malcolm embraced his legacy and with reverence for his grandfather identified himself as the grandson, namesake and first male heir of the greatest revolutionary of the 20th century," the memorial service program read.

Malcolm X was shot to death in 1965 as he delivered a speech in a Harlem ballroom.

Shabazz was laid to rest last week near his grandparents at the Ferncliff Cemetery in Hartsdale.

Based on reporting by The Associated Press.

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