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Land disputes spark violence over evictions at Haiti displacement camps 3 years after quake

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    In this April 24, 2013 photo, Darlin Lexima speaks on the phone as he walks through Camp Acra in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Lexima, 21, who lives in the camp for people displaced by the 2010 earthquake, was arrested by police early April 15 when he was walking home from a disco club as police were responding to residents protesting an earlier raid by an unidentified band of motorcyclist who set fire to their homes. In the few weeks since the mid-April confrontation, it has become an instant symbol for what many say is the growing use of threats and sometimes outright violence to clear out sprawling displaced person camps, where some 320,000 people still live. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)The Associated Press

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    In this April 24, 2013 photo, Darlin Lexima, left, holds his head after seeing the body of Merius Civil on a computer, shown to him by camp leader Elie Joseph Jean-Louis inside Lexima's tent home at Camp Acra in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Lexima, 21, was arrested by police while walking home from a disco club on the same early morning that Civil was arrested, on April 15 while residents at their camp were protesting a raid by motorcyclists who set fire to their homes. Civil's sister says her brother was taking out the trash when he was arrested. Lexima said he later saw Civil in police custody, too dazed to speak. The law firm of Patrice Florvilus, an attorney representing the dead man’s family and other Camp Acra residents, said that it believes Civil died at the Delmas station, and that witnesses reported seeing officers carry a sheet-covered body from the station to a patrol car. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)The Associated Press

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    In this April 30, 2013 photo, camp leader Elie Joseph Jean-Louis holds up a photograph of the body of Merius Civil after he was allegedly beaten by police during a protest in the Delmas district of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Civil was arrested by police early April 15, who according to his sister was taking out the trash, when police stormed the camp as residents were protesting a raid by motorcyclist who set fire to their homes. The band of motorcyclists came to Camp Acra hours after attorney Reynold Georges arrived with a judge and a police officer and told the some 30,000 people who had lost their homes in the 2010 earthquake that they were squatting on his land and had to leave, witnesses said. If they didn't vacate, he said he'd have the place burned down and leveled by bulldozers. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)The Associated Press

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    In this April 24, 2013 photo, Darlin Lexima shows a scar covering his collar bone which he says was inflicted by a police beating as he stands outside his home at Camp Acra in the Delmas district of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Lexima, 21, was arrested by police early April 15 when he was walking home from a disco club, as residents at his camp were protesting a raid by motorcyclists who set fire to their homes. The band of motorcyclists arrived to Camp Acra hours after attorney Reynold Georges came with a judge and a police officer and told the some 30,000 people who had lost their homes in the 2010 earthquake that they were squatting on his land and had to leave, witnesses said. If they didn't vacate, he said he'd have the place burned down and leveled by bulldozers. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)The Associated Press

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    In this April 25, 2013 photo, Darlin Lexima is treated for injuries by family members at his home in Camp Acra in the Delmas district of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Lexima says his injuries are from being beating by police with their batons and the butts of their pistols and rifles in the Delmas police station after he was arrested by police early April 15 when he was walking home from a disco club, as police were responding to residents at his camp who were protesting an earlier raid by motorcyclists who set fire to their homes. The motorcyclists came to Camp Acra hours after attorney Reynold Georges arrived with a judge and a police officer and told the some 30,000 people who had lost their homes in the 2010 earthquake that they were squatting on his land and had to leave, witnesses said. If they didn't vacate, he said he'd have the place burned down and leveled by bulldozers. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)The Associated Press

Rights groups and other activists say there is a growing use of threats and sometimes outright violence in Haiti to clear out sprawling camps that are home to some 320,000 people still homeless since the country's 2010 earthquake.

A standoff at one camp last month has become a symbol of the problem for many people. It set off a chain of events that left several shelters burned and a camp resident dead.

The confrontation occurred a little more than a week before the human rights group Amnesty International issued a report on the jump of camp evictions seen in Haiti this year.