World

Violence and fraud are top worries in Philippine elections dominated by powerful clans

  • A Filipino man carries crates of beverages past election posters in Manila, Philippines on Sunday May 12, 2013. The country will elect local officials from senators to congressmen and down to municipal mayors on Monday's mid-term elections. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    A Filipino man carries crates of beverages past election posters in Manila, Philippines on Sunday May 12, 2013. The country will elect local officials from senators to congressmen and down to municipal mayors on Monday's mid-term elections. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)  (The Associated Press)

  • A Filipino man rides his motorcycle past layers of election posters in suburban Quezon city, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday May 12, 2013. The country will elect local officials from senators to congressmen and down to municipal mayors on Monday's mid-term elections. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    A Filipino man rides his motorcycle past layers of election posters in suburban Quezon city, north of Manila, Philippines on Sunday May 12, 2013. The country will elect local officials from senators to congressmen and down to municipal mayors on Monday's mid-term elections. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)  (The Associated Press)

  • Election workers transfer official ballots on a truck at a distribution center in Manila, Philippines on Sunday May 12, 2013. The country will elect local officials from senators to congressmen and down to municipal mayors on Monday's mid-term elections. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

    Election workers transfer official ballots on a truck at a distribution center in Manila, Philippines on Sunday May 12, 2013. The country will elect local officials from senators to congressmen and down to municipal mayors on Monday's mid-term elections. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)  (The Associated Press)

Philippine officials say despite scattered killings and fears of fraud, congressional and local elections on Monday are expected to be relatively peaceful after authorities took drastic steps to prevent any chaos.

Philippine military spokesman Brig. Gen. Domingo Tutaan says the 120,000-strong armed forces and the police are on full alert and are ready to deal with any emergencies. Army troops dropped leaflets from helicopters calling for peaceful elections in Masbate province, one of several potential hotspots with a history of poll violence.

Election officials ordered a ban on bank withdrawals of more than 100,000 pesos ($2,440) and the transportation of more than 500,000 pesos ($12,200) for six days to curb vote-buying, but the Supreme Court stopped the move.