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South Koreans still hope to resume businesses at jointly run factory with North Korea

  • 4c481e0f0aeb600d2f0f6a7067006afa.jpg

    Visitors look at products made at Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea displayed at the complex's showroom at the unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, that has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, April 18, 2013. The South Korean entrepreneurs who invested up to 10 years and millions of dollars in the Kaesong industrial complex, a symbol of economic collaboration between the rival Koreas that is now shuttered by the North, have little more than hope to cling to as assembly lines sit idle day after day. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)The Associated Press

  • bfdbc7c80aec600d2f0f6a706700597d.jpg

    Visitors look at products made at Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea displayed at a showroom at the unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, that has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, April 18, 2013. The South Korean entrepreneurs who invested up to 10 years and millions of dollars in the Kaesong industrial complex, a symbol of economic collaboration between the rival Koreas that is now shuttered by the North, have little more than hope to cling to as assembly lines sit idle day after day. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)The Associated Press

  • 203126ad0aec600d2f0f6a706700d587.jpg

    A South Korean soldier walks by products made at Kaesong industrial complex in North Korea displayed at a showroom at the unification observation post near the border village of Panmunjom, that has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, April 18, 2013. The South Korean entrepreneurs who invested up to 10 years and millions of dollars in the Kaesong industrial complex, a symbol of economic collaboration between the rival Koreas that is now shuttered by the North, have little more than hope to cling to as assembly lines sit idle day after day. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)The Associated Press

The South Korean entrepreneurs who invested up to 10 years and millions of dollars in the shuttered Kaesong industrial complex across the border in North Korea have little more than hope to cling to as assembly lines sit idle day after day.

They say they want to go back to work. The sooner the better. They say they cannot abandon their investments in factories, or the cheap North Korean labor that helped them put aside misgivings about doing business with the South's unpredictable neighbor.

North Korea has been unrelenting in its decision to bar South Koreans from entering the factory city and withdraw the 53,000 North Korean workers who manned assembly lines.

As the lockout enters a third week, some businesses are already quietly mulling giving up on Kaesong altogether.