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Tunisia's prime minister says plan for technocratic government to resolve crisis lacks support

  • 8b2a26c3eddee105290f6a706700f645.jpg

    Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali, right, is pictured with Ennahda party leader Rached El Ghannouchi at the opening of a meeting with representatives of all Tunisian political parties, to see if there is sufficient support for his solution to end the country's ongoing political crisis in Carthage, outside Tunis, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Jebali's initiative, while supported by the opposition, puts him on a collision course with the moderate Islamist Ennahda Party which dominates the government. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi) (The Associated Press)

  • 0e637d73ecc4dc05290f6a70670076ff.jpg

    Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali, center, arrives for meeting with political parties in an effort to end a crisis exacerbated by a political assassination two weeks ago, outside Tunis, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Jebali's initiative, while supported by the opposition, puts him on a collision course with the moderate Islamist Ennahda Party, which dominates the government and insists on sticking with a cabinet of political figures. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi) (The Associated Press)

  • de78cd6feddbe105290f6a70670006de.jpg

    Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali, right, smiles at the opening of a meeting with representatives of all Tunisian political parties, to see if there is sufficient support for his solution to end the country's ongoing political crisis in Carthage, outside Tunis, Monday, Feb. 18, 2013. Ennahda party leader Rached El Ghannouchi is seated at left. Jebali's initiative, while supported by the opposition, puts him on a collision course with the moderate Islamist Ennahda Party which dominates the government. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi) (The Associated Press)

Tunisia's prime minister says his initiative to solve the country's political crisis with a new Cabinet of technocrats has failed.

Hamadi Jebali told journalists Monday following meetings with representatives of the main political parties that the technocrat option did not benefit from a consensus and that they are moving toward another solution.

He did not elaborate, only adding that he would meet with President Moncef Marzouki Tuesday to discuss the next steps.

Tunisia was plunged into a political crisis after the assassination on Feb. 6 of a leftist opposition politician provoked anti-government riots around the country.

Jebali called for a technocratic government to guide the country to new elections, but his own party, the moderate Islamist Ennahda, rejected his initiative, which had received opposition support.