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Spain's attorney says party financing probe may be opened and PM Rajoy could be quizzed

  • cdc72ebfc0172a03280f6a7067003582.jpg

    FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 3, 2012 file photo, Spain's Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy reacts during a news conference at the Moncloa Palace in Madrid. Spain's governing Popular Party insists its financial accounts are totally legal and denies a newspaper report of regular under-the-table payments to leading members, including current Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. The scandal first broke when after the National Court reported that former party treasurer Luis Barcenas amassed an unexplained euro 22 million ($30 million) in a Swiss bank account several years ago. In a statement Thursday Jan. 31, 2013, the party denied the existence of "hidden accounts" or "the systematic payment to certain people of money other than their monthly wages."(AP Photo/Paul White, File) (The Associated Press)

  • 90135ca3c2eb3703280f6a706700b954.jpg

    Protestors hold banners reading, 'resign' 'this is enough' during a demonstration against corruption, in Madrid, Spain, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013. Spain's governing Popular Party insists its financial accounts are totally legal and denies a newspaper report of regular under-the-table payments to leading members, including current Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. The scandal first broke when after the National Court reported that former party treasurer Luis Barcenas amassed an unexplained euro 22 million ($30 million) in a Swiss bank account several years ago. In a statement Thursday Jan. 31, 2013, the party denied the existence of "hidden accounts" or "the systematic payment to certain people of money other than their monthly wages. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki) (The Associated Press)

  • 495109bcc2fc3703280f6a70670078d9.jpg

    Protestors shouts slogans as they hold an banner reading 'resign' during a demonstration against corruption, in Madrid, Spain, Thursday, Jan. 31, 2013. Spain's governing Popular Party insists its financial accounts are totally legal and denies a newspaper report of regular under-the-table payments to leading members, including current Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy. The scandal first broke when after the National Court reported that former party treasurer Luis Barcenas amassed an unexplained euro 22 million ($30 million) in a Swiss bank account several years ago. In a statement Thursday Jan. 31, 2013, the party denied the existence of "hidden accounts" or "the systematic payment to certain people of money other than their monthly wages. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki) (The Associated Press)

Spain's state attorney says there is sufficient cause to investigate fresh allegations of irregular financing of Spain's governing Popular Party and that if necessary Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy would be called in for questioning.

Speaking on 13TV television late Thursday, Eduardo Torres-Dulce was referring to El Pais' publication of the so-called "secret papers" of former party treasurer Luis Barcenas, allegedly documenting systematic payments of under-the-table money to leading members, including Rajoy over many years. The money was allegedly paid by businesses, many in the construction sector.

Torres-Dulce said a decision on opening a fresh investigation or possibly incorporating the allegations into one already existing will be taken within days.

El Pais on Friday said nearly two thirds of the payments were in violation of Spain's old party financing law.