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British Foreign Office says hostage crisis in Algeria 'remains ongoing'

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    This Oct. 8, 2012 satellite image provided by DigitalGlobe shows the Amenas Gas Field in Algeria, which is jointly operated by BP and Norway's Statoil and Algeria's Sonatrach. Algerian special forces launched a rescue operation Thursday at the plant in the Sahara Desert and freed foreign hostages held by al-Qaida-linked militants, but estimates for the number of dead varied wildly from four to dozens. (AP Photo/DigitalGlobe) (The Associated Press)

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    Statoil's CEO Helge Lund, arrives to meet at the centre for relatives to the hostages in Algeria, which has been established near the airport, in Bergen, Norway, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. Algerian forces launched a military assault Thursday at a natural gas plant in the Sahara Desert, trying to free dozens of foreign hostages held by militants who have ties to Mali's rebel Islamists, diplomats and an Algerian security official said. Yet information on the Algerian operation varied wildly and the conflicting reports that emerged from the remote area were impossible to verify independently (AP Photo/Hakon Mosvold /NTB Scanpix) NORWAY OUT (The Associated Press)

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    Algerian men look at national newspapers headlining the terrorist attack and kidnapping in Amenas at a news stand in Algiers, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. Algerian forces raided a remote Sahara gas plant on Thursday in an attempt to free dozens of foreign hostages held by militants with ties to Mali’s rebel Islamists, diplomats and an Algerian security official said. Information on the Algerian assault in the remote area was wildly varying _ Islamic militants claimed that 35 hostages and 15 militants died in a strafing by Algerian helicopters, while Algeria’s official news service claimed hundreds of local workers and half the foreigners were rescued. (AP Photo/Ouahab Hebbat) (The Associated Press)

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    A man reads a newspaper headlining "Terrorist attack and kidnapping in In Amenas", at a news stand in Algiers, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. Algerian forces raided a remote Sahara gas plant on Thursday in an attempt to free dozens of foreign hostages held by militants with ties to Mali’s rebel Islamists, diplomats and an Algerian security official said. Information on the Algerian assault in the remote area was wildly varying _ Islamic militants claimed that 35 hostages and 15 militants died in a strafing by Algerian helicopters, while Algeria’s official news service claimed hundreds of local workers and half the foreigners were rescued. (AP Photo/Ouahab Hebbat) (The Associated Press)

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    Statoil CEO Helge Lund, left, and Director of Foreign Operations, Lars Christian Bacher, exit from a meeting at Statoil head quarters building in Stavanger, Norway, Thursday Jan, 17, 2013. Algerian forces raided the remote Amenas gas plant on Thursday in an attempt to free dozens of foreign hostages held by militants with ties to Mali's rebel Islamists, according to diplomats on Thursday, and Islamic militants claim that 35 hostages and 15 militants were killed after Algerian military helicopters strafed the area but said seven hostages survived. (AP Photo / Kent Skibstad, NTB scanpix) NORWAY OUT (The Associated Press)

Britain's Foreign Office says the hostage crisis in Algeria "remains ongoing" but it has given no details of the situation.

In a statement released Friday morning, the Foreign Office said: "We are not in a position to give further information at this time."

Algerian helicopters and special forces stormed a gas plant in the stony plains of the Sahara on Thursday to wipe out Islamist militants and free hostages from at least 10 countries. Bloody chaos ensued, leaving the fate of the fighters and many of the captives uncertain.

The British statement repeated Prime Minister David Cameron's warning that the nation should be prepared for bad news.