World

Latino Unemployment Rate Sees Big Drop

In this March 30, 2010 photo, Ike Ibeawuchi, second from left, of Mountain View, Calif., and Steve Jordan, second from right, of Oakland, Calif., are interviewed by representatives of Primerica financial services at a career fair presented by National CareerFairs in San Jose, Calif. The Labor Department on Thursday, April 8, 2010 said the number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment benefits rose last week, a sign that jobs remain scarce even as the economy recovers. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

In this March 30, 2010 photo, Ike Ibeawuchi, second from left, of Mountain View, Calif., and Steve Jordan, second from right, of Oakland, Calif., are interviewed by representatives of Primerica financial services at a career fair presented by National CareerFairs in San Jose, Calif. The Labor Department on Thursday, April 8, 2010 said the number of newly laid-off workers seeking unemployment benefits rose last week, a sign that jobs remain scarce even as the economy recovers. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

The unemployment rate among Hispanics has decreased to 11.9 percent, down from 13.2 percent in November --a 1.3 percent positive change according to the Department of Labor-- marking the largest positive change among all groups in the month of January.

November marked the highest unemployment rate among Hispanics since 1983 when it was 14.3 percent.

Nationally, 36,000 jobs were created as the unemployment rate fell only by 0.4 percentage point to 9.0 percent for the month.

Since November, the unemployment rates among Whites fell .8 percentage point from 8.8 percent to 8.0 percent and Blacks saw a .3 percentage point decline from 16 percent to 15.7 percent.

According to the EPI, Economic Policy Institute, few believe that the unemployment rate will dip below 6 percent before 2014, the latest projections from the Congressional Budget Office predict the unemployment rate might dip to just above 7 percent in that year.

The EPI report also predicts that the unemployment rate through 2012 among blacks will remain over 15 percent and among Hispanics it will still be around 11 percent.

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Bryan Llenas currently serves as a New York-based correspondent for Fox News Channel (FNC). Click here for more information on Bryan Llenas. Follow him on Twitter @BryanLlenas.