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13 nations sign declaration meant to save tigers

tiger2007

FILE: In this May 12, 2007 a one-year-old Bengal Tiger Banti looks for water at the Nehru Zoological Park in Hyderabad, India. According to Yuri Fedotov head of the U.N. office on drugs and crime about 150 tigers -- or 5% of the world's tiger population are killed each year by poachers.AP

Officials from the 13 countries where tigers live in the wild have signed a declaration aimed at saving the iconic big cats from extinction.

The accord signed Monday stipulates the nations will strive to double the world's tiger population by 2022. They will also preserve and enhance their habitats and crack down on poaching and illicit trade in tiger pelts and body parts.

The number of tigers has plunged some 95 percent over the past century. The 3,200 remaining tigers are under threat from poachers and habitat loss.

Many of the countries with tigers, such as Laos, Bangladesh and Nepal are impoverished. Saving tigers may depend on sizable donations.

Russia is home to Siberian tigers. Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin hosted the "tiger summit."