Middle East

Islamic Neckties, Hijab-Wearing Dolls Introduced in Iran, Website Reports

  • The necktie, designed by Hemat Komeili, is decorated with quotes by the Prophet Muhammad and is shaped like the sword of Shiite Imam Ali, Mumammad's cousin and brother-in-law, who is considered a holy figure in Iran, YNetNews.com reports.

    The necktie, designed by Hemat Komeili, is decorated with quotes by the Prophet Muhammad and is shaped like the sword of Shiite Imam Ali, Mumammad's cousin and brother-in-law, who is considered a holy figure in Iran, YNetNews.com reports.

  • Two previous dolls in Iran that were supposed to counter the West's "Barbie" and "Ken" -- "Sarah" and "Dara" -- were not very popular, but "Fatima" has a more Islamic visage and is meant to battle against the "enemies' cultural invasion" of Iran.

    Two previous dolls in Iran that were supposed to counter the West's "Barbie" and "Ken" -- "Sarah" and "Dara" -- were not very popular, but "Fatima" has a more Islamic visage and is meant to battle against the "enemies' cultural invasion" of Iran.

Talk about cutting-edge fashion ... check out the Islamic sword tie. Just in time to look sharp for the holidays.

The sword-shaped tie is just one of a series of Islamocentric products that have been unveiled in Iran recently, according to a report on YNet. There's also a hijab-wearing Barbie doll wannabe that goes by the name "Fatima." And there's also a new smiley-face in Iran -- instant messaging software called the "Hijab Messenger." Feel free to LOL.

The necktie, designed by Hemat Komeili, is decorated with quotes from the Prophet Muhammad and is shaped like the sword of Imam Ali, Muhammad's cousin and brother-in-law, who is considered a holy figure in Shiite Iran.

Sporting a tie has been generally condemned as one of the symbols of Western culture since Iran's Islamic revolution in 1979. But Komeili says his inventive design has received approval from some of the country's Shiite scholars,YNet reports.

Meanwhile, the Iranian company Fam says it has created "Fatima," the first Islamic doll. Though two previous dolls -- "Sarah" and "Dara" -- were supposed to counter Barbie and Ken, they were not very popular in the Islamic Republic. But Fatima has a more Islamic visage and is meant to battle against the "enemies' cultural invasion" of Iran.

"By creating Barbie and marketing it, Westerners are encouraging bad veiling and not wearing the hijab," Hossein Seresht, a representative of Fam, told YNet. "All of these factors led us to take it as our duty to present Islamic dolls to the market."

Fam has also launched a new software package intended to promote proper wearing of the hijab. Seresht told YNet.  The software includes videos of Islamic fashion, speeches on wearing the headscarf and "Hijab Messenger," an instant messenger service that allows chats only between "people who are defined within the system." 

Click here to read more on this story from YNetNews.com.