World

Judge Dismisses Parts of Arizona's Immigration Law

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, after meeting with Obama Administration officials regarding the border, immigration, and National Guard troop deployment, talks about the meeting at the capitol Monday, June 28, 2010, in Phoenix. The officials told the governor that 524 of the 1,200 National Guard troops headed to the U.S. Mexican border will be deployed in the state. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer, after meeting with Obama Administration officials regarding the border, immigration, and National Guard troop deployment, talks about the meeting at the capitol Monday, June 28, 2010, in Phoenix. The officials told the governor that 524 of the 1,200 National Guard troops headed to the U.S. Mexican border will be deployed in the state. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

A federal judge has dismissed parts of a lawsuit by the American Civil Liberties Union and other civil rights groups that challenged Arizona’s controversial immigration law.

U.S. District Judge Susan Bolton’s partial dismissal had been requested by Gov. Jan Brewer, Maricop County Sheriff Joe Arpaio, Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu and Pinal County Attorney James Walsh.

There were initially seven challenges to the SB107 law, which requires law enforcement officers to question people about their immigration status. Two of the seven challenges have been dismissed in their entirety.

Despite the dismissal, Judge Bolton’s ruling keeps alive other claims in the lawsuit.

The Associated Press contributed to this story.