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Jury Hears Final Witness in Amanda Knox Murder Case

The Italian jury in the trial of Amanda Knox, an American college student accused of murdering her British roommate, has finished hearing evidence from witnesses and a verdict could come in a few weeks.

A computer expert appearing as a defense witness was among the last to testify Saturday before the court in the hill town of Perugia.

Knox, 21, is jointly charged with her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 25, of the brutal sex murder of Meredith Kercher, who was found semi-naked with her throat cut.

Prosecutors say Knox and Sollecito killed Kercher, 21, after she refused to take part in a drug-fueled sex game.

The defendants deny wrongdoing.

News reports quoted the computer expert as saying that while Sollecito was being questioned at police headquarters a few days after the slaying, someone used his home computer to read about the killing.

The trial will resume Oct 9. The court is expected to take up procedural matters before closing arguments begin.

Forensic experts in the Meredith Kercher trial are expected Friday to deny that American murder suspect Amanda Knox faked a break-in to throw police off the track.

Knox, 21, is jointly charged with her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, 25, of the brutal sex murder of Kercher, who was found semi-naked with her throat cut.

The court will continue to hear evidence from the defense, which they say points to the fact that Rudy Guede — already convicted of murdering and sexual assaulting Kercher — was the lone culprit.

Prosecutors say Knox and Sollecito killed Kercher, 21, after she refused to take part in a drug-fuelled sex game.

They also allege Knox smashed a window in the house where Kercher lived in Perugia to make her death look like a botched break in.

But retired police forensic officer Vincenzo Pasquali will use a video and ballistic measurements to tell the court the window was smashed from the outside and was not simulated.

Pasquali will also tell the court how it was possible for someone to enter the house through the broken window, which was 13 feet above ground.

The court has already heard how 21-year-old Guede, a small-time drug dealer, was known to carry a knife.

It was also told he carried out a series of break-ins in the weeks leading up to the murder in November 2007.

Among these was a burglary at a lawyer's office, in which he climbed through a window 15 feet above ground — higher than that smashed at the murder scene.

But police have insisted the broken window at Kercher's house was too high to clamber through.

Knox's lawyer Carlo Della Vedova said Knox was "doing well" and was glad the trial was moving to its closing stages.

The lawyer said: "She was very pleased with how she gave evidence last month and is very confident.

''She has her mother and young sister visiting her and her friends have also been to see her and they are keeping her spirits up. She is carrying on with her studies and is also doing plenty of sport.''

Kercher, from England, was a Leeds University student and was in Perugia as part of her European Studies degree. She had only been in Italy for two months when she was murdered.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.