Randy Carlyle, who coached the Anaheim Ducks to the Stanley Cup championship in 2007, signed a two-year extension Wednesday.

Financial terms were not announced.

"In my mind, it is a very important announcement for our franchise and I would like to congratulate Randy on this. He earned it," general manager Brian Burke said. "He has brought accountability to our organization. We play Ducks hockey, which Randy is the architect of. It is high-octane, up-tempo, physical, old-school hockey."

The 52-year-old Carlyle, hired Aug. 1, 2005 as the seventh coach in franchise history, has guided the Ducks to a franchise-record three consecutive trips to the postseason. They have won six of their eight playoff series during that time, tied with the Detroit Red Wings for the best in the NHL.

Carlyle, who is now under contract for three seasons, also has the most wins and highest winning percentage in franchise history, compiling a record of 138-74-34 (.630 winning percentage).

"This extension means a lot to me and my family that we have three more years to get the job done here," Carlyle said. "We've had some success. It's been a working environment that's been very easy for me and my family to join. I think that's the most important thing, that there's a huge comfort zone with the job that I have in Anaheim."

Carlyle said negotiations started right after the season.

"It took all of probably about three or four days going back and forth," the coach said. "I represented myself, and Brian represented the organization. It really came together quite quickly. It was something we had talked about as early as January. We said that we'd put it off until after the season, and we did.

"We weren't very happy with the way the season ended for us."

The Ducks finished second in the Pacific Division and fourth in the Western Conference with a 47-27-8 record and 102 points before being eliminated by Dallas in the first round of the playoffs.

The Ducks were 48-20-14 for 110 points in the 2006-07 season, when they set several franchise records en route to their first Stanley Cup championship.