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The Most Memorable Weather Moments in the NFL

Following a winter storm that dumped snow on fans and players at both the Philadelphia Eagles and the Baltimore Ravens games on Sunday, Dec. 8, 2013, we take a look at the most memorable weather moments in the NFL.

See below for a list of the top five unforgettable weather-influenced games in NFL history.

1. The Ice Bowl

Concluding with the third straight NFL Championship for the Green Bay Packers, this December 1967 championship game between the Packers and the Dallas Cowboys went down in history for its freezing conditions.

At the time of kickoff the temperature at Lambeau Field in Green Bay, Wisc., was 13 F below zero and, by the end of the game, the wind chill in the stadium was 40 F below zero.

Nearly 51,000 fans braved the frigid wind but prolonged exposure to the cold cost one fan their life. During the game, the referees yelled out signals to prevent their metal whistles from freezing to their lips. By the end of the game, several players were treated for frostbite but the Packers came out on top earning the NFL title by beating the Cowboys 21-17.

2. The Freezer Bowl

As fans' beer froze in their cups, the 1982 AFC Championship game on Jan. 10, 1982, between the Cincinnati Bengals and the San Diego Chargers became known as the "Freezer Bowl" due to its low temperatures.

During the game the temperature in Cincinnati dropped to 9 F below zero as the wind gusted to over 50 mph. The wind chill factor at the game measured to 59 F below zero, putting this game in the history books as the game with the coldest wind chill ever recorded in the NFL.

While more than 46,000 fans showed up for the start of the game, many left at halftime due to the extreme cold. The day's official high temperature plummeted to 4 F below zero, making this January day the sixth-coldest day in the city's history.

However, despite the wind and frigid cold the Bengals conquered the Chargers with a final score of 27-7.

3. The Fog Bowl

Despite clear blue skies as the game began, the second half of the Dec. 31, 1988 NFC Division Playoff game between the Chicago Bears and the Philadelphia Eagles took a turn for the worst.

Right before half-time dense fog from Lake Michigan encompassed Solider Field. Visibility was reduced from clear conditions to less than 20 yards and even the announcers and fans were unable to see the game.

The Bears proved victorious over the Eagles with a score of 20-12, but most of the points were scored in the first half with only six points total between the two teams scored during the second half.

4. The Sleet Bowl

While this Thanksgiving Day game went down in history for Leon Lett's fumble that cost the Dallas Cowboys the game victory against the Miami Dolphins, the game was also the first time ever that winter precipitation was recorded on Thanksgiving in Dallas.

A local cold front with strong winds and black and blue skies, also called a Blue Norther, brought cold temperatures and sleet to the Texas Stadium in Irving, Texas on game day in 1993.

Sleet covered the field that day making it hard for players to keep their balance during the game, resulting in a low scoring game and the blunder that gave the Dolphins a win.

5. The Mud Bowl

The second-worst flash flood on record for Kansas City struck the city's metropolitan area on Oct. 4, 1998, right in time for the game between the Kansas City Chiefs and the Seattle Seahawks at Arrowhead Stadium.

Two separate rounds of thunderstorms brought heavy rainfall to the area causing excessive flash flooding throughout the city during the afternoon and evening hours.

The heavy rains delayed the start of the game by 54 minutes and, by the end of the day, approximately four inches of rain fell inside the stadium. Despite the damp conditions, the Chiefs defeated the Seahawks 17-6.


Have questions, comments, or a story to share? Email Kristen Rodman at Kristen.Rodman@accuweather.com, follow her on Twitter @Accu_Kristen or Google+. Follow us @breakingweather, or on Facebook and Google+.