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Nari Steams for Vietnam as Wipha Eyes Japan

Two powerful Pacific storms, both of them typhoons as of Saturday, will threaten to unleash destructive winds and flooding rain as they sweep towards their ultimate destinations over the next few days.

Vietnam and Japan will be greatest risk of direct storm impact with threats to life and property.

Nari, the first of the two storms, will churn westward over the South China Sea Sunday. A landfall on the central Vietnam coast, potentially as a dangerous typhoon, is expected on or about Monday, EDT.

Destructive winds and an inundating storm surge at the coast will be greatest threats near the site of storm landfall. Hue, Da Nang and Quong Ngai could be in the direct path of Nari.

Friday, Typhoon Nari swept westward over the island of Luzon, Philippines, where the worst of its potentially destructive winds and rain passed north of Manila. Nari then continued to plow westward over the South China Sea on Saturday.

Farther north and east, Wipha, the newer of the two major Pacific storms, was gathering strength far to the south of Tokyo, Japan, on Saturday.

Wipha will strengthen further over the open Philippines Sea Sunday through Monday as it spins towards the northwest and the north. Tuesday and Wednesday, Wipha will accelerate towards the northeast, tracking near or even clipping the coast of eastern Japan near Tokyo late Tuesday or early Wednesday, EDT.

While details of Wipha's path and intensity will be subject to change going forward, there already are indications that the typhoon could spread excessive rainfall over a big swath of central and northern rainfall. Destructive winds may also hit greater Tokyo along with eastern and northeastern Honshu.

Wipha, which was designated a tropical storm on Friday, was upgraded to a typhoon on Saturday. This made Wipha the twelfth typhoon of 2013. It was already the 26th named tropical storm of the year. A normal western Pacific tropical cyclone season has about 26 named storm of which 16 become typhoons.