Man stole ticket from Don Larsen's 1956 perfect game, police say

A Louisiana man this week had a valuable World Series ticket from New York Yankees pitcher Don Larsen’s 1956 perfect game — the only perfect game thrown during a World Series — stolen by a homeless man he had befriended, according to authorities.

A family member had passed down the heirloom to a man residing in Slidell — a city 30 miles from New Orleans, the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office said in a news release.

The ticket gave admission to the history-making Game 5 of the 1956 World Series, in which Larsen got every batter out in shutting out the Brooklyn Dodgers, 2-0.

Former New York Yankees pitcher Don Larsen tips his cap during introductions for the 65th Old Timers' Day game before their MLB interleague baseball game with the Colorado Rockies at Yankee Stadium in New York, June 26, 2011. REUTERS/Ray Stubblebine  (UNITED STATES - Tags: SPORT BASEBALL) - GM1E76R0IVA01

Former New York Yankees pitcher Don Larsen tips his cap during introductions for the 65th Old Timers' Day game in New York on June 26, 2011.  (Reuters)

The Oct. 8 game drew 64,519 fans and remains the only perfect game ever thrown during baseball's Fall Classic. Yankees greats Yogi Berra and Mickey Mantle, who homered during the game, took part in the win.

Tickets from the game can be worth as much as $6,000, according to the news release.

The owner of the ticket called police Monday and reported an acquaintance had stolen it that morning, police said. He told responding officers that “he had a soft spot for those who were down on their luck” and had taken in two such individuals Sunday night.

The man told officers that Jeffery Garmon, 20, and his brother, who were staying at his home, were shown the ticket that night before going to bed. He awoke to the sound of the brothers leaving and noticed the folder where he kept the ticket lying open on the kitchen counter, empty, police said.  

Garmon, who had a reputation with the responding deputies, was located less than an hour later at a “usual hangout,” police said. The stolen ticket turned up in a consensual search of Garmon’s backpack.

Garmon was arrested and charged with one count of felony theft between $5,000 and $25,000.

The history-making ticket was returned to its owner.