CRIME

Justice pans police response to Minnesota black man's death

  • FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2015, file photo, a police officer sprays a liquid towards demonstrators outside the Minneapolis Police Department 4th Precinct building in Minneapolis. People were protesting the fatal shooting of Jamal Clark by Minneapolis police. A federal review Monday, March 20, 2017, of an 18-day standoff outside the Minneapolis police precinct following Clark’s fatal shooting has found problems with the city's coordination and communication. Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators.(Jeff Wheeler/Star Tribune via AP, File)

    FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2015, file photo, a police officer sprays a liquid towards demonstrators outside the Minneapolis Police Department 4th Precinct building in Minneapolis. People were protesting the fatal shooting of Jamal Clark by Minneapolis police. A federal review Monday, March 20, 2017, of an 18-day standoff outside the Minneapolis police precinct following Clark’s fatal shooting has found problems with the city's coordination and communication. Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators.(Jeff Wheeler/Star Tribune via AP, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office shows Jamar Clark of Minneapolis. A federal review Monday, March 20, 2017, of an 18-day standoff outside a Minneapolis police precinct following the fatal shooting of Clark in 2015 has found problems with the city's coordination and communication. Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators. (Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)

    FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Hennepin County Sheriff's Office shows Jamar Clark of Minneapolis. A federal review Monday, March 20, 2017, of an 18-day standoff outside a Minneapolis police precinct following the fatal shooting of Clark in 2015 has found problems with the city's coordination and communication. Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators. (Hennepin County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2015, file photo, Jeremiah Ellison, center right, son of U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, stands near police during a protest at the Minneapolis Police Department 4th Precinct building in Minneapolis. A federal review Monday, March 20, 2017, of an 18-day standoff outside the Minneapolis police precinct following the fatal shooting of Jamar Clark in 2015 has found problems with the city's coordination and communication. Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though the one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP, File)

    FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2015, file photo, Jeremiah Ellison, center right, son of U.S. Rep. Keith Ellison, stands near police during a protest at the Minneapolis Police Department 4th Precinct building in Minneapolis. A federal review Monday, March 20, 2017, of an 18-day standoff outside the Minneapolis police precinct following the fatal shooting of Jamar Clark in 2015 has found problems with the city's coordination and communication. Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though the one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators. (Renee Jones Schneider/Star Tribune via AP, File)  (The Associated Press)

A federal review of an 18-day standoff outside a Minneapolis police precinct following the fatal shooting of a black man in 2015 has found problems with the city's coordination and communication.

The Justice Department's review Monday came at the city's request after the shooting of 24-year-old Jamar Clark.

Clark's death in a confrontation with two officers sparked weeks of protests that were largely peaceful, though one on Nov. 18 included skirmishes between officers and demonstrators.

The review found the city didn't have a coordinated response to the occupation and didn't have a plan for managing a civil disturbance as it became a long-term event.

The city's mayor and police chief planned to comment later Monday.

The county prosecutor and the U.S. attorney both declined to charge the two officers involved.