RELIGION

Critics: Trump should not ignore domestic terrorist threats

  • FILE - In this May 5, 1995 file photo, a large group of search and rescue crew attends a memorial service in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. In 1995, domestic terrorism seemed to be the most immediate threat to Americans. Now President Donald Trump and his supporters say the nation’s greatest security risk lies in attackers who potentially sneak into the U.S. from abroad. But a list of worldwide attacks recently released by the administration left off many that were carried out by right-wing extremists and white supremacists. (AP Photo/Bill Waugh, File)

    FILE - In this May 5, 1995 file photo, a large group of search and rescue crew attends a memorial service in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. In 1995, domestic terrorism seemed to be the most immediate threat to Americans. Now President Donald Trump and his supporters say the nation’s greatest security risk lies in attackers who potentially sneak into the U.S. from abroad. But a list of worldwide attacks recently released by the administration left off many that were carried out by right-wing extremists and white supremacists. (AP Photo/Bill Waugh, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE - In this Tuesday, June 8, 2004 file photo, death penalty opponent Bud Welch, whose daughter, Social Security Administration worker Julie Marie Welch, 23, died in the Oklahoma City bombing, is interviewed in McAlester, Okla. Welch said he disagrees with President Donald Trump's executive order banning travelers from certain countries. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

    FILE - In this Tuesday, June 8, 2004 file photo, death penalty opponent Bud Welch, whose daughter, Social Security Administration worker Julie Marie Welch, 23, died in the Oklahoma City bombing, is interviewed in McAlester, Okla. Welch said he disagrees with President Donald Trump's executive order banning travelers from certain countries. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017 photo, Jannie Coverdale is seen under a picture of the Oklahoma City National Memorial in her home in Oklahoma City. Her grandsons, Aaron and Elijah Coverdale were killed in the 1995 bombing. Coverdale said she sees a terrorism risk from potential attackers who sneak into the U.S. from abroad. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

    In this Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017 photo, Jannie Coverdale is seen under a picture of the Oklahoma City National Memorial in her home in Oklahoma City. Her grandsons, Aaron and Elijah Coverdale were killed in the 1995 bombing. Coverdale said she sees a terrorism risk from potential attackers who sneak into the U.S. from abroad. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)  (The Associated Press)

President Donald Trump and his supporters say the nation's greatest security risk lies in attackers who potentially sneak into the U.S. from abroad. But a list of worldwide attacks recently released by the administration left off many that were carried out by right-wing extremists and white supremacists.

And organizations that track terrorist and hate groups say the government focuses too narrowly on threats from the outside instead of adopting a broader approach.

Bud Welch knows something about the human cost of terrorism. His 23-year-old daughter was killed when a rental truck packed with explosives destroyed the Oklahoma City federal building.

Welch says he doesn't see much difference between the Islamic State terrorism group and the anti-government militia movement in the U.S.