RELIGION

White House expresses confidence travel ban will be restored

  • Iranian-born bioengineer researcher Nima Enayati holds up his boarding pass at the Milan's Malpensa International airport in Busto Arsizio, Italy, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2017. Just hours after an appeals court blocked an attempt to re-impose the travel ban, Iranian researcher Nima Enayati checked in on an Emirates Airline flight direct from Milan’s Malpensa airport to New York’s JFK on Sunday afternoon. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

    Iranian-born bioengineer researcher Nima Enayati holds up his boarding pass at the Milan's Malpensa International airport in Busto Arsizio, Italy, Sunday, Feb. 5, 2017. Just hours after an appeals court blocked an attempt to re-impose the travel ban, Iranian researcher Nima Enayati checked in on an Emirates Airline flight direct from Milan’s Malpensa airport to New York’s JFK on Sunday afternoon. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)  (The Associated Press)

  • Family members who have just arrived from Syria embrace and are greeted by family who live in the United States upon their arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

    Family members who have just arrived from Syria embrace and are greeted by family who live in the United States upon their arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)  (The Associated Press)

  • Tawfik Assali, 21, center, of Allentown, Pa., embraces his sister Sarah Assali, 19, upon her and other family members' arrival from Syria at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. Right is Mathew Assali, 17, who arrived today. Attorneys said Dr. Assali's brothers, their wives and their two teenage children returned to Syria after they were denied entrance to the United States on Jan. 28 although they had visas in hand after a 13-year effort. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

    Tawfik Assali, 21, center, of Allentown, Pa., embraces his sister Sarah Assali, 19, upon her and other family members' arrival from Syria at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, Monday, Feb. 6, 2017. Right is Mathew Assali, 17, who arrived today. Attorneys said Dr. Assali's brothers, their wives and their two teenage children returned to Syria after they were denied entrance to the United States on Jan. 28 although they had visas in hand after a 13-year effort. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)  (The Associated Press)

The White House says it expects the courts to restore President Donald Trump's ban on refugees and travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries. Its argument for the executive order is founded on a claim of national security.

The next opportunity for the president's team to argue in favor of the ban will come in the form of a response to a lawsuit by Washington state and Minnesota contending that Trump's order harms residents and effectively mandates discrimination.

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeal has ordered the Justice Department to file its briefs by 6 p.m. EST Monday.

The San Francisco-based appeals court has already turned down a Justice Department request to set aside immediately a Seattle judge's ruling that put a temporary hold on the ban nationwide.