Ohio

Killers' lawyers seek more info on Ohio's lethal drug supply

  • This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Robert Van Hook, convicted of the fatal 1985 strangling and stabbing of David Self, a man he met in a bar in Cincinnati. Van Hook's lawyers asked a federal magistrate Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, to allow them to challenge Ohio's new three-drug execution method. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

    This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Robert Van Hook, convicted of the fatal 1985 strangling and stabbing of David Self, a man he met in a bar in Cincinnati. Van Hook's lawyers asked a federal magistrate Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, to allow them to challenge Ohio's new three-drug execution method. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Alva Campbell, convicted of fatally shooting Charles Dials of Columbus, Ohio, during a carjacking after Campbell escaped from police custody during a 1997 court appearance in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio authorities told a federal magistrate in January 2017 that the state has at least enough drugs on hand to put Campbell to death in May 2017 as the fourth execution using the state's new three-drug execution method, according to attorneys for another death row inmate. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

    This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Alva Campbell, convicted of fatally shooting Charles Dials of Columbus, Ohio, during a carjacking after Campbell escaped from police custody during a 1997 court appearance in Columbus, Ohio. Ohio authorities told a federal magistrate in January 2017 that the state has at least enough drugs on hand to put Campbell to death in May 2017 as the fourth execution using the state's new three-drug execution method, according to attorneys for another death row inmate. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Robert Van Hook, convicted of the fatal 1985 strangling and stabbing of David Self, a man he met in a bar in Cincinnati. Van Hook's lawyers asked a federal magistrate Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, to allow them to challenge Ohio's new three-drug execution method. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)

    This undated photo provided by the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction shows death row inmate Robert Van Hook, convicted of the fatal 1985 strangling and stabbing of David Self, a man he met in a bar in Cincinnati. Van Hook's lawyers asked a federal magistrate Tuesday, Jan. 17, 2017, to allow them to challenge Ohio's new three-drug execution method. (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction via AP)  (The Associated Press)

Lawyers for condemned inmates are trying to learn more about Ohio's supply of execution drugs at a time the state prisons agency is reluctant to give out that information.

At issue is whether Ohio has enough drugs for a handful of executions or a supply that could greenlight more than two dozen executions over the next four years.

A filing this week on behalf of an inmate scheduled to die in July attempts to force the state to say more about the drugs it possesses.

Lawyers for that death row prisoner, Robert Van Hook, asked a federal magistrate Tuesday to allow them to challenge the state's new three-drug execution method.

The lawyers say they need time to prepare that challenge, assuming the state has enough execution drugs available.