CRIME

Woman enters no contest plea in Oklahoma homecoming crash

  • FILE - In this June 1, 2016, file photo, Adacia Chambers arrives for a court hearing in Stillwater, Okla. Chambers is accused of driving her car into spectators at Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade and killing four people in 2015. Her trial is scheduled to start Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 in Stillwater. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

    FILE - In this June 1, 2016, file photo, Adacia Chambers arrives for a court hearing in Stillwater, Okla. Chambers is accused of driving her car into spectators at Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade and killing four people in 2015. Her trial is scheduled to start Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 in Stillwater. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE -This Oct. 24, 2015 FILE image taken from video shows the scene in Stillwater, Okla. as a car crashes into spectators at Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade. The trial for the driver, Adacia Chambers who is charged with four counts of second-degree murder and 46 counts of felony assault begins Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 in Stillwater. (Connor J. Greco via AP, File)

    FILE -This Oct. 24, 2015 FILE image taken from video shows the scene in Stillwater, Okla. as a car crashes into spectators at Oklahoma State University's homecoming parade. The trial for the driver, Adacia Chambers who is charged with four counts of second-degree murder and 46 counts of felony assault begins Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2017 in Stillwater. (Connor J. Greco via AP, File)  (The Associated Press)

A woman charged with killing four people by driving her car into spectators at Oklahoma State University's 2015 homecoming parade has entered a no contest plea.

If a judge agrees to the deal with prosecutors, Adacia Chambers would be sentenced to life in prison on four murder counts and additional time for the assault and battery of others injured in the crash.

Prosecutors say Chambers steered her car around a police barricade and sped up before plowing into spectators ahead of Oklahoma State's game against the University of Kansas. Prosecutors say her actions showed intent.

Chambers' attorneys say she has a mental illness and suffered a psychiatric episode at the time of the crash. Her father said she had received psychiatric treatment at an in-patient facility several years ago.