California

Woman once accused of faking abduction defends herself to online harassers

Lawyer Anthony Douglas Rappaport speaks at a news conference with his clients, Denise Huskins and her boyfriend Aaron Quinn, right, in San Francisco, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. Matthew Muller, a disbarred Harvard University-trained attorney pleaded guilty Thursday to kidnapping Huskins in a bizarre case that police in California initially dismissed as a hoax. (AP Photo/Sudhin Thanawala)

Lawyer Anthony Douglas Rappaport speaks at a news conference with his clients, Denise Huskins and her boyfriend Aaron Quinn, right, in San Francisco, Thursday, Sept. 29, 2016. Matthew Muller, a disbarred Harvard University-trained attorney pleaded guilty Thursday to kidnapping Huskins in a bizarre case that police in California initially dismissed as a hoax. (AP Photo/Sudhin Thanawala)  (The Associated Press)

A woman once accused of making up her abduction says she is still getting harassment online despite her kidnapper pleading guilty to the crime several months ago.

In a Facebook post on Sunday, Denise Huskins defended herself to strangers who still accuse her of fabricating her abduction from two years ago. She included a screenshot of a profanity-laced private message from a man in Illinois.

“Unfortunately this is just one example of countless messages like this that I have received,” she wrote.

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In the message, the man from Peoria, Illinois, wrote: “Are you that horrible lying woman who faked her own kidnapping? ... You are going to hell for the bulls*** you have done.”

He said he wanted to slap her a few times and have his wife beat her up.

“Just so u know, ur not as pretty as u think,” he added. “I’d put u at being a 5 outta 10.”

Huskins said the message, like others before, inspired what she called “one of my many PTSD episodes of terror.”

“My jaw and back are sore from the deep powerful shaking and reflexive tension that my whole body goes into. My eyes are sore and red from uncontrollable tears. I am thoroughly exhausted, every inch of my body is tired from the fit of terror it was battling,” she explained.

Suspect in abduction once called a hoax set to plead guilty

Huskins continued: “Congratulations, person I have never met, never heard of who hates me so much that he went out of his way to message me this disgusting, demeaning, dehumanizing outrage.”

Matthew Muller, a disbarred Harvard University-trained attorney, pleaded guilty in September to kidnapping Huskins and held her for ransom in March 2015. Police in California initially dismissed as a hoax.

Her boyfriend, Aaron Quinn, said kidnappers broke into the couple's Vallejo, California, home, took Huskins and demanded $8,500 as a ransom — a figure that police have said they found small for what would have been an elaborate kidnapping.

Disbarred attorney pleads guilty to California kidnapping once thought hoax

Huskins turned up safe two days later in her hometown of Huntington Beach, where she says she was dropped off. After she reappeared, Vallejo police called the kidnapping a hoax.

Huskins sued, accusing police of wrongly likening the case to the movie "Gone Girl" and damaging the reputations of her and her boyfriend.

Attorneys for police have said investigators doubted Quinn's account of the abduction and grew more skeptical when Huskins refused to reunite with her family soon after she reappeared.

In a post on Monday, Huskins thanked her followers for their support.“I know it's tempting to meet anger with anger, it's something that we have struggled with frequently these past two years. But the battle we are fighting is way beyond this individual man, and his one disgusting statement,” she wrote.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.