New York

New subway line, awaited since the 1920s, is set to roll

  • FILE- In this April 12, 2007 file photo, a Metropolitan Transit Authority employee climbs the stairs to the street from the partly finished track of the 2nd Avenue subway prior to the ground breaking ceremony in New York. Construction first started 45 years ago, but New Yorkers' long wait to take a subway under Manhattan's far Upper East Side ends at noon Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017, when a stretch of the new Second Avenue line is set to open to the public. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    FILE- In this April 12, 2007 file photo, a Metropolitan Transit Authority employee climbs the stairs to the street from the partly finished track of the 2nd Avenue subway prior to the ground breaking ceremony in New York. Construction first started 45 years ago, but New Yorkers' long wait to take a subway under Manhattan's far Upper East Side ends at noon Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017, when a stretch of the new Second Avenue line is set to open to the public. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this Dec. 22, 2016 file photo, workers put the finishing touches on the new 86th Street subway station on the Second Avenue Subway in New York. Straphangers' long wait to take a subway under Manhattan's far Upper East Side ends at noon on Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017, with the inaugural ride of the Second Avenue line. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    FILE- In this Dec. 22, 2016 file photo, workers put the finishing touches on the new 86th Street subway station on the Second Avenue Subway in New York. Straphangers' long wait to take a subway under Manhattan's far Upper East Side ends at noon on Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017, with the inaugural ride of the Second Avenue line. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)  (The Associated Press)

  • FILE- In this Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016 file photo, a construction worker cuts stone near an entrance of the unfinished Second Avenue subway in New York. Nearly 45 years after construction began, a long-delayed subway line beneath Manhattan's east side goes into operation on Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

    FILE- In this Wednesday, Dec. 14, 2016 file photo, a construction worker cuts stone near an entrance of the unfinished Second Avenue subway in New York. Nearly 45 years after construction began, a long-delayed subway line beneath Manhattan's east side goes into operation on Sunday, Jan. 1, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)  (The Associated Press)

New York residents' long wait to take a subway under Manhattan's far Upper East Side is coming to an end.

At noon Sunday a stretch of the new Second Avenue line is set to open to the public.

Trains rolled ceremonially Saturday night, while dignitaries toasted underground.

The nearly 2-mile segment adds stations along Second Avenue at 96th, 86th and 72nd streets and connects them to a different subway line at 63rd Street and Lexington Avenue. It's seen as crucial to alleviating congestion in the nation's biggest subway system.

It's expected to carry about 200,000 riders daily.

The city's transportation board first envisioned a Second Avenue subway in 1929.