US

Communities work to become age-friendly for residents

  • In this Friday, Dec. 9, 2016, photo, Eva Bonilla poses for a photo on a curb ramp newly built in her neighborhood in Fort Worth, Texas. The onramp to the sidewalk was built in part due to Bonilla's effort to make her community more age friendly. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

    In this Friday, Dec. 9, 2016, photo, Eva Bonilla poses for a photo on a curb ramp newly built in her neighborhood in Fort Worth, Texas. The onramp to the sidewalk was built in part due to Bonilla's effort to make her community more age friendly. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this July 2016 photo provided by Jane Chandler, a group of people walk along a paved pathway in Bethel, Maine, including John Holliday, fourth from left wearing a red shirt. Bethel is among communities across the United States working to become more age-friendly. Holliday walks the paved pathway in the summer, but in the winter he walks laps at a private school gym, recently made available for seniors as part of the town's age-friendly initiative. Hundreds of big and small communities around the world are working to make sure people can live there from birth to old age. Experts said that community efforts to become more age-friendly are gaining momentum, especially as the number of people 65 and older is expected to nearly double by 2050. (Jane Chandler via AP)

    In this July 2016 photo provided by Jane Chandler, a group of people walk along a paved pathway in Bethel, Maine, including John Holliday, fourth from left wearing a red shirt. Bethel is among communities across the United States working to become more age-friendly. Holliday walks the paved pathway in the summer, but in the winter he walks laps at a private school gym, recently made available for seniors as part of the town's age-friendly initiative. Hundreds of big and small communities around the world are working to make sure people can live there from birth to old age. Experts said that community efforts to become more age-friendly are gaining momentum, especially as the number of people 65 and older is expected to nearly double by 2050. (Jane Chandler via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Dec. 9, 2016 photo, Eva Bonilla walks along a section of sidewalk at Linwood Jesse D. Sandoval Park in Fort Worth, Texas. The sidewalk was built in part due to Bonilla's effort to make her community more age friendly. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

    In this Dec. 9, 2016 photo, Eva Bonilla walks along a section of sidewalk at Linwood Jesse D. Sandoval Park in Fort Worth, Texas. The sidewalk was built in part due to Bonilla's effort to make her community more age friendly. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)  (The Associated Press)

Hundreds of big and small communities around the world are working to make sure people can live there from birth to old age.

In 2012, the AARP started its Network of Age-Friendly Communities to find ways to enrich life for seniors. Since then, more than 130 towns, cities and countries across the U.S. have joined the program.

Efforts have included offering classes teaching technology to increasing bus service to revitalizing parks.

Experts say that community efforts to become more age-friendly are gaining momentum, especially as the number of people 65 and older is expected to nearly double by 2050.