Massachusetts

Volleyballers vs. bulldozers: A Chinatown's history at stake

  • In this Aug. 14, 2016 photo provided by Virginia Tow, players of the Boston Knight A volleyball team, front, go up for a spike against the Boston Hurricanes Black team during the August Moon Festival at Reggie Wong Park in the Chinatown neighborhood in Boston. The fate of a modest asphalt court where Chinese immigrants developed a unique style of volleyball is uncertain. The state of Massachusetts is seeking proposals to develop a prime slice of real estate near Boston's Chinatown that was a nursery for nine-man volleyball. (Virginia Tow via AP)

    In this Aug. 14, 2016 photo provided by Virginia Tow, players of the Boston Knight A volleyball team, front, go up for a spike against the Boston Hurricanes Black team during the August Moon Festival at Reggie Wong Park in the Chinatown neighborhood in Boston. The fate of a modest asphalt court where Chinese immigrants developed a unique style of volleyball is uncertain. The state of Massachusetts is seeking proposals to develop a prime slice of real estate near Boston's Chinatown that was a nursery for nine-man volleyball. (Virginia Tow via AP)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Nov. 29, 2016 photo, a view of Reggie Wong Park is seen next to a steam plant, at right. The fate of the modest asphalt court near where Boston Chinatown immigrants created a unique style of volleyball is uncertain. The state is seeking proposals to develop the prime slice of real estate south of downtown that's home to Reggie Wong Park, a steam plant and a state government office. The park is the latest battleground in the long-simmering debate over gentrification in one of the nation's oldest and largest Chinatowns. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    In this Nov. 29, 2016 photo, a view of Reggie Wong Park is seen next to a steam plant, at right. The fate of the modest asphalt court near where Boston Chinatown immigrants created a unique style of volleyball is uncertain. The state is seeking proposals to develop the prime slice of real estate south of downtown that's home to Reggie Wong Park, a steam plant and a state government office. The park is the latest battleground in the long-simmering debate over gentrification in one of the nation's oldest and largest Chinatowns. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)  (The Associated Press)

  • In this Nov. 29, 2016 photo, people tour a MassDOT district building with views of land parcels slated for development. The fate of a modest asphalt court near where Boston Chinatown immigrants created a unique style of volleyball is uncertain. The state is seeking proposals to develop the prime slice of real estate south of downtown that's home to Reggie Wong Park, a steam plant and a state government office. The park is the latest battleground in the long-simmering debate over gentrification in one of the nation's oldest and largest Chinatowns. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    In this Nov. 29, 2016 photo, people tour a MassDOT district building with views of land parcels slated for development. The fate of a modest asphalt court near where Boston Chinatown immigrants created a unique style of volleyball is uncertain. The state is seeking proposals to develop the prime slice of real estate south of downtown that's home to Reggie Wong Park, a steam plant and a state government office. The park is the latest battleground in the long-simmering debate over gentrification in one of the nation's oldest and largest Chinatowns. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)  (The Associated Press)

The fate of a modest asphalt court near where Boston Chinatown immigrants developed a unique style of volleyball is uncertain.

The state is seeking proposals to develop a prime slice of real estate south of downtown that's home to Reggie Wong Park, a steam plant and a state government office.

The state has required developers to preserve the park space somewhere on the site, but some community groups want the state to require a larger park with more amenities.

Russell Eng, who coaches teen volleyball, says the park named after his uncle help keeps the Chinese community connected even as more now live in the suburbs.

The park is the latest battleground in the long-simmering debate over gentrification in one of the nation's oldest and largest Chinatowns.